Translate

====================

Monday, 11 April 2016

My way to add a new core thread in a chain

I started a bride's necklace with DMC polyester thread D5200, I've already used it, very good for jewellery. I wanted a necklace to match earrings tatted with the pattern that I showed in last post, I still have to tat them with the same thread.
At the end of the second row I didn't want to cut the thread, but I realised that I run out the core thread. That was a bit annoying because in my pattern next round is all chains and there isn't any ring where I would have had the opportunity to hide the ends.

I wanted a lot of beads in next round, so I had to stop and loaded them on both shuttle and ball threads.


I tatted normally (reversing work from rings to chains) in the first two rows but then, in the next all-chains row, I worked using "direct tatting" (or "all front tatting" or "reverse stitches, rs" - not sure though - sorry, terminology is not my forte), that is the stitches are wrapped onto the core thread in the same way as you tat the second side of split rings.

In pictures, my core thread comes from the spool. The second-shuttle is yellow in pics.

I looped the new core thread and passed the old core thread through that loop (blue shuttle in pics).
First of all, I knew that I needed beads also in that very first chain, so I passed again the new thread back through 4 beads, with the help of a needle. I ensured that I had plenty core thread to anchor both new thread and loop tail around my little finger.
 
I tatted some rs on the folded auxiliary shuttle's thread. When I needed a bead, I slid it in place. Then, I shortened the loop done with the auxiliary shuttle (pulling the tail attached to the blue shuttle in pics) and continued working on the loop done with the core thread, slid another bead an so on.

When I finished my 4 beads, I shortened also the end tail coming from the loop done with the core thread. I cut redundant ends and went on tatting.

 

In next posts, I'll show the rest of the adventure, of when I run out of the second shuttle's thread and when I thought I had finished it but found that I had forgot a whole chain in the middle of the necklace! AAARGH! Eventually it is finished but it ruffles... Maybe, I put too much beads!


As you see in the above picture, beads are inserted in the core thread alternating 1 bead and 1 ds, it is a well known technique for those tatters who does tat beanile lace (developed since 1986). Anyway, this method of inserting queues of beads has been copyrighted by the master tatter Alena Vyčichlová  in 2007, you should have a look at her site www.frivolitka.com, if you haven't yet, it is full of absolutely wonderful tatted jewellery.

chau
( http://www.joeskitchen.com/chile/2011/12/07/how-to-say-goodbye-in-chile/ )
Ninetta
--------
Something not about tatting.
I've been noting that LinkWithin did not fetch from very old posts. After a little investigation, I discovered that - don't know why - it can re-call only from the pool of the last 150 blog-posts. I'm working to improve the navigation in this site, so I started adding a "Related posts" section at the end of each post, updated by hand.
--------
Related posts:

8 comments:

  1. Thanks for showing us how you joined in a thread, and for the link. I'm not convinced about her claim to have invented the technique, but there is certainly beautiful work there.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for sharing that technique!! :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. So smart!!! A pleasure to follow your ideas!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thank you very much, Jane, Sue and Corina!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Bravissima!!! Grazie tante per la condivisione ...

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thanks for sharing both your methods - you make it look so "Elementary, my dear Ninetta" :-)
    Will keep both in mind & try : my chains may get broken, but not my will !

    ReplyDelete

Thank you very much for all your nice comments.

Ciao
Ninetta