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Dear Reader,
I share here what I like and what works for me. If you've been following me, you know that I can change my mind from time to time, and feel free to comment that I'm completely wrong, you may be right. I'm not running a business. I'm not paid and have never received any compensation or facilitation for any review/brand/site here mentioned. In case one day we'll ever meet, I'll be the one offering you a cup of Italian coffee, too.
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Tuesday, 20 October 2020

unusual scalloped edge

Another post for the "Endrucks 1920" project.

That is my tatting for the pattern #14 in the "Schiffchen-Spitzen" book, by E.Endrucks, from 1920, it is available here: http://www.georgiaseitz.com/public/publicindex.html

I think that I'll go on tatting that, at least about one meter, for a nice linen towel's edging. I like this scalloped edging a lot, a very unusual and original shape for tatting, it makes me forget that the pattern it's turning 100!

You can start CTM, all one colour, but I chose to tat it in two colours to better follow the pattern. Thread is DMC Special Dentelles size 80. 

As in previous pattern (the n.8, read previous post: vintage trees), the bottom part is the side of the edging that should be attached to the fabric.

In the pattern there are true thrown off (floating) rings, that makes it a 2 shuttles pattern. There are tatters who prefer tatting with shuttle and ball and transform all floating rings in mock rings. The difference is minimal but it can be spotted, because of the different effect on the chain, it changes the curve. The next is a narrow edging with mock rings on chains, that I've tatted some years ago:

I've uploaded my diagram in Flickr (click to see a better image):

endrucks n.14

The pattern starts with the little ring 6-6 on the left, but, alternatively, you can start directly with the block tatting part, omitting the first ring and the chain 6-6-6. In that case, the pattern would start with a picot, then a chain 4-4-4-4, something like in previous pattern n.8, that started directly with a chain. They usually call it the “dead end” start, but in this case it is with a starting picot. There are some links to various tutorials in Muskaan's page https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/p/tatting-resources.html, if some links there don't work, in the URL you should change blogspot.in with blogspot.com

The original instruction in previous Eldrucks' pattern number 8 was to start CTM with one double stitch, then leave a very small picot, then tat the first row of the block tatting. That is only one way to start the "dead end" chain without a clip. I think that it may be helpful to figure this method as if they started CTM in the "Diag.1" drawing in this photo: (Block Tatting how to by Julie Patterson: http://www.georgiaseitz.com/2012/blockpatterson.jpg) .

Ciao,
Ninetta

Tuesday, 13 October 2020

vintage trees

My tatting today is for the "Endrucks 1920" project. It is a collective project. It all started here:  https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2015/11/pattern-eleonores-angels.html

That is only a short sample for the pattern #8 in the "Schiffchen-Spitzen" book, by E.Endrucks, from 1920, it is available here: http://www.georgiaseitz.com/public/publicindex.html

(direct link: http://www.georgiaseitz.com/public/endrucks/eleonoreendrucks-leichtensternschiffchenspitzenbook1920.pdf)

It is an edging and in the book's picture it is shown upside down, that is the bottom part is the side that should be attached to the fabric. It's lovely, it looks like trees, maybe the single tree can be used in greeting cards, just an idea.

It could have been one shuttle and ball pattern but there's one thrown off (floating) ring, that makes it a 2 shuttles pattern. You can start CTM, all one colour, but I chose to tat it in two colours to better follow the pattern. Thread is DMC Special Dentelles size 80.

The dense trunk is block tatting, you can follow your favourite method to do it. I tatted the rows in a way similar to that explained in Julie Patterson's drawing (2006): https://www.georgiaseitz.com/2012/blockpatterson.jpg

Each row is connected to the previous row with lock joins. But that is not the only way to join. I have a video in my channel in YouTube, comparing the Patterson's joining method to Jane Eborall's method (2007, amended in 2013: https://janeeborall.freeservers.com/BlockTattingEasy.pdf ). This is the link to the video in YouTube: https://youtu.be/oxGV7b3xK20. I think that if you use the J.Eborall's way of joining, you would need to leave very small picots in all rows for the trunk, just after each join, but I haven't tried that.

About YouTube, I'd like sending you all my heartfelt thanks, for I reached 1K subscribers on my channel! That is amazing, I can't believe it! Thank you, thank you! It's a long time since my last video, I don't know when I will post another one. With the "kids' restrictions" they deleted all comments and I lost the infos like the date posted, but I hope that it's not a problem! Videos are still there!

I've uploaded my diagram in Flickr (click to see a better image):

endrucks n.8

You have already noticed that in the diagram and in my tatting the first row was tatted, then I reversed work and tatted the first ring, then I didn't reverse work and switched shuttle, tatting the second row for the trunk. On the second row, there's no need to leave small picots because the lock joins itself let a very small space.

If you tat only one "tree" and attach the last ring to the first, a little tube will pop up. Sometimes it happens that you find things by chance, so... That are the earrings that sprung up from the tree:

The bottom part is a separated element, 4 rings flower (all 6-6-6-6 rings joined at the first picot), that contains the 8mm pearl, topped by a 6mm bicone swarovski; the "leaves" below are two rings, (21ds-3ds, and 3ds+21ds). I put 2mm bicone swarovski on picots, added one onion ring at the base of the "vintage tree" and finished with an SSSR, like in Miranda's tutorial -  http://tattingfool.blogspot.it/2011/07/finishing-with-sssr.html

Ciao,
Ninetta

Tuesday, 6 October 2020

seventh blog anniversary

Before everything else, VERY important news: thanks to Susan Fuller, Georgia Seitz's site is up again! Visit the new pages here: http://www.georgiaseitz.com/

🎂🎂🎂🎂🎂🎂🎂

Yesterday was my blog anniversary, it started in 2013. Wow, I can't believe that I've been blogging for so long! Thanks to you all, my readers, I couldn't have been here without you 💓 and thanks to all tatters that share their tatting online, so I could learn a bit more every day!

Sorry that I disappeared from the blogsphere for a month! I have been busy test tatting my own pattern, the Swirling Butterflies doily. In this moment the photo-tutorial for the pattern is in Italian and it is still a draft. There are over 20 pages, with a lot to amend! My heartfelt thanks to two sweet ladies and very expert tatters, who are helping me, testing all 11 rounds: one is Paola Bevilacqua (you can find her in Facebook) and the other is Muskaan. I hope to have the privilege to show you soon the doily tatted by Paola.

Now, you would ask, how Muskaan can read Italian... so: she can't, but she's a tatting Master and she is following my drawings, tracking down my mistakes! Her help is priceless, she's been sharing her thoughts and variations in her blog:

https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2020/09/4-plus-1-is-5.html
https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2020/09/7-plus-6-is-13.html
https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2020/09/3-and-1-and-2.html
https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2020/09/3rd-times-charm.html

She also partecipated to my tat-along, two years ago, when I shared the first 3 rounds: https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2018/09/twist-n-twirl-spiral-n-swirl.html

The thread that I used in the green doily, the prototype, was Anchor size 70. In the new white version I've used DMC Special Dentelles size 80. The two doilies are the same size that is nearly 30cm from tip to tip. The Anchor thread is softer than DMC. I still didn't shorten the antennas in the white doily but it will be gifted away so I will cut them later.

The next picture is my own tatting, I can't remember when I did it (but few years ago), it was a gift and lately I've had the chance to take a photo, that I didn't take at the moment that I gave it away. It is a pattern by Jan Stawasz from the book "Tatting theory and patterns". Thread is dmc Special Dentelles size 80.

The doily is finished but I've some side projects. I still have the Bosa lace to be finished (almost there) and then I decided to join Muskaan in the "Endrucks 1920" project, that is to convert in modern tatting notation and diagrams the patterns in the "Schiffchen-Spitzen" (by E.Endrucks) 1920 book, that is available in Georgia Seitz's archive here: http://www.georgiaseitz.com/public/publicindex.html

I will tat and try to diagram patterns #8, #14, #24 and #40. In the next picture there's my first trial of the #8.

You can read about Muskaan project here:  https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2015/11/pattern-eleonores-angels.html

Ciao,
Ninetta

Tuesday, 8 September 2020

irish rose

Nothing new, I think, just all chains and lock joins in between. But petals are tatted with treble tatting stitches and it looks 'a new thing'!

Here are my attempts to tat something lovely around the rose.

The back side is interesting, too:

LEGEND
ds : double tatting stitch
tds : treble tatting stitch
R : ring
Ch: chain
- : picot
vsp : very small picot
SR : Split Ring
FR : floating ring
LJ : lock join
CTM : continuous thread method


Basic pattern for the Irish rose:
With one shuttle and the ball CTM or 2 shuttles CTM.

Round1) The rose starts with a ring: 7 very small picots separated by 1ds, close ring. Reverse work.
Always use a mock picot to climb up to next round.
From now on, it is only chains.
Round2) Ch 1ds; LJ to next vsp (let always a vsp over the LJ); repeat 7 more times.
Round3) Ch 1ds,1tds,vsp,1ds; LJ to next vsp (let always lie the current chain under the previous round); repeat 7 more times.
Round4) Ch 1ds,2tds,vsp,1ds; LJ to next vsp; repeat 7 more times.
Round5) equal to Round4
Round6) equal to Round4
Round7) Ch 1ds,3tds,vsp,1ds; LJ to next vsp; repeat 7 more times.
Round8) Ch 1ds,5tds,vsp,1ds; LJ to next vsp; repeat 7 more times.

The rose can be beautified around as per your personal taste. I think that many different patterns can be found, just keeping the rose in the center. I tatted two versions.

The ecrù rose was tatted with dmc cordonnet size 20 thread.
From round 1 to 8, it is the basic pattern. Then:
Round9) Ch 6ds-6ds; LJ to next vsp; repeat 7 more times.
Round10) Ch 5ds-5ds-5ds; LJ to next vsp; repeat 7 more times.
Round11) Ch 7ds-7ds; LJ to next vsp; 1ds,3tds,vsp,1ds; LJ to next vsp. Repeat all around.

The orange&white rose was tatted with dmc special dentelles size 80 thread.
From round 1 to 6, it is the basic pattern. Then (I added one more round than the basic pattern):
Round7bis) equal to Round4
Round8bis) equal to Round7
Round9bis) equal to Round8
Round10bis) Split ring (to climb up to next round): 6ds/6ds;
*Chain: 6ds-2ds; Trefoil [FR 2ds-3ds-3ds-3ds; FR 3ds, join to last picot of previous FR, 3ds-3ds-3ds; FR 3ds, join to last picot of previous FR, 3ds-3ds-2ds]; Chain: 2ds, join to last picot of previous FR, 6ds.
Ring: 6ds, join to next vsp of previous round, 6ds
Repeat from * all around.

🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹

If you share any of my patterns, please put a link to this blog, don't copy and past pictures. I hope you understand, thank you in advance.

Please refer to the page "Treble Tatting Stitch - Summary" - https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/p/blog-page_95.html for any info about treble tatting stitches, thank you.

Ciao,
Ninetta

Tuesday, 25 August 2020

swirling earrings

Thread is Sanbest metallic 4 strands, color number 1565. Pattern is the centre of the "swirling butterflies" doily (you can find the link in the patterns page in the menu bar).


With another background:

Ciao,
Ninetta

Saturday, 22 August 2020

page update

I've updated the page "TREBLE TATTING STITCH - SUMMARY" https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/p/blog-page_95.html

to add this line: 

NOTATION for Graduated or Variable Treble Tat Stitch (tds) [Muskaan’s proposal]: https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2020/05/double-trouble-motif.html

Ciao,
Ninetta

Tuesday, 18 August 2020

gold rope chain

That is just a line of interlocking split rings.

I've already finished one bracelet, the gold version. It is the one that I like most, it is very similar to the real gold rope chain! I've used metallic Sanbest thread, 4 strands, color gold, number 121. For the other two bracelets I'm tatting with metallic Sanbest, too.

Pattern is a line of split rings: 8ds/8ds. And that's all.

It is tatted with the third method that I showed here: https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/2016/06/interlocking-since-1869.html

... but in this case, I pull a loop of the shuttle1 thread (from front to back) through the previous two rings:

Then the loop is put around your hand, in the normal position to tat a split ring. The most important thing to remember is to leave the bare thread sufficient for "a playing space" (how do you call that?) between rings.

Ciao,
Ninetta
UPDATE - links to Muskaan's photo-tutorials:
Part1: https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2020/08/locked-in-study.html
Part2: https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2020/08/locked-in-play.html
Part3: https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2020/08/locked-in-rope.html

Another UPDATE: I updated the old post to add this note:  The "Interlocking Split Rings" as an element in tatting was first introduced by Mrs Ruth Perry, in 1998 (different method but same result, two lines of split rings tatted at the same time, no bare thread between split rings). Read about it here: http://www.georgiaseitz.com/2004/plaits/rpcane.html)

Tuesday, 4 August 2020

locked in the old corner

I found this interesting pattern in an old book, here: http://www.georgiaseitz.com/public/emmyliebert/liebertbk1reprint.pdf

The original book is Emmy Liebert Book 1, from 1916, then the online book is a Dutch version. The same pattern has been published many times in various books.


It looks like a rounded motif that has trefoils attached in a second moment. But that's not true.
Corners are tatted in the last round, with the second shuttle (ball thread) that is: leave a bare thread space, then tat the trefoil. Just like floating rings.
Then, when I came back to the round, to give the twisted effect, I joined two times the thread, with lock joins. I don't read Dutch, so that is my solution, just looking at the picture and guessing.

I started with two shuttles CTM, and then climbed up with a split ring. If I tat it again, for something like an earring, for example, I would tat it cutting the thread between rounds. But I've had a chat with Dr. Downplay and he said that my sample is pretty good as it is!

It's been a nice challenge and, as always, old patterns teach us a lot. Ready in a couple of hours!
Ciao,
Ninetta.

Tuesday, 28 July 2020

no mirror, no tiling

Celtic earrings with treble tatting stitches.
What does the title mean? You're right, I should know...
 
Browsing the web - trying to find any instructive site about celtic knots - I've found that Wikipedia has an entry and that at the end of the page there are some very interesting links.

One of those, it is an online celtic knot generator: http://obyx.org/knots.obyx

I filled the form with parameters: (3,2,0,0,no mirror, no tiling), and every time you click the "regenerate" button, you get few different drawings. I chose two of them and tried to transpose to tatting.



Thread is 4 strands Sanbest metallic thread, color numbers 17 and 1565.
If you like them, I can share the pattern. It is true celtic, because I started from celtic drawings, but they can be easily tatted with one shuttle and the ball, the weaving part being only at the end.

It's been very hard sewing ends, it seems that my eyesight is getting worse... I used the camera as it was a magnifying glass! It works wonderfully!
Ciao,
Ninetta
UPDATE: Please refer to the page "Treble Tatting Stitch - Summary" - https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/p/blog-page_95.html for any info about treble tatting stitches, thank you.

Tuesday, 21 July 2020

learning the celtic knot

I made that earrings up for the Italian Facebook group, in which we are tatting together and learning what celtic tatting is.
It's not very original, it just helped me to understand the celtic knot. 

Some links where I found instructions:

- a video by Karen Cabrera, Frivolite tatting lesson 82 Nudo celta celtic knot: https://youtu.be/FAAEnw50YbLQ 

- the pattern at the end of Karen's video is by Heather Cook, I found it here, with her instruction - even it is different, it's a knot with two chains - (I thank her also for the tips for drawing):  http://www.tattedtreasures.com/2011/11/easy-celtic-motif-pattern/

- Ruth Perry (aka Rozella Linden) wrote many books with celtic patterns (that I don't  have) and she has a blog and a site where she shares some of her patterns for free: https://rozellalinden.net/free/
http://rozellalinden.blogspot.com/

- Wally Sosa wrote one book that is still available for purchase, I bought it some years ago: https://www.etsy.com/listing/34199697/book-celtic-tatting-with-a-twist

➿➿➿➿➿➿➿
After the celtic knot, that I closed with a lock join to the starting picot, I didn't cut the thread. 
I tatted a ring 8-8ds, leaving a very small bare thread space, then I curled and blocked it in position (with a normal join), over the lock join, moving both threads up to continue.
To insert the earrings' post, I used the same method and stitch count that I used for the earrings in the "Parure Anne", that I explained here: https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/2020/06/parure-anne-with-pattern.html#Anneorrearringspattern

Actually the celtic knot is just a knot and it needs a rope to be knotted! Then, I tatted a long chain of 120 ds.

Starting a 'dead end chain' may be done in few different ways, there's a blog post by Muskaan with links and pics: 

Here I choose the method suggested by Sue Hanson, making a mock picot and second half ds unflipped and using a short loop of thread in place of the paper clip, that is because I used the starting point of the chain to weave the celtic knot.

The difficult here is to keep an even tension through the chain. It needs a little exercise. I suggest to push the stitches as you go and pay attention to don't let behind unwanted small picots.

I prepared a drawing that helped me to make the knot and my first attempt was with a shoelace. Starting from the asterisk, I pinned the last ds of the chain and followed carefully my line, passing over and under. Then I joined the two ends with a lock join.

Hope to see your tatted celtic knot soon! Join us on Facebook!

🚀🚀🚀🚀🚀
Woo-hoo! This is my 500th post!!! Thank you everyone for your kind support 🙏 ❤!

Ciao, 
Ninetta 

Tuesday, 14 July 2020

weave

I often go to the WordReference.com because you already know, my poor English vocabulary don't let me free to write whatever I want, but just what I can, doing my best (let alone the pronuntiation, that is terrible!). So... I found two meanings for the verb to weave, one is to make something by interlacing and the second is to make a fabric by weaving (in Italian we have two different words). I thought it would have been a nice title for this post.

Thread is cotton size 80, the multicolored is Lizbeth, the green was already on the shuttle and I can't remember the brand.

Sue Hanson shared with the group her early Celtic work on her old Web Page:
She wrote that the pattern for her 6 pointed Celtic design was published in the Lace Guild’s magazine (UK) #93 in January 1999. She's a pioneer in modern tatting.

The appearance of two celtic motifs in a line in my blog, it is due to a Facebook event, in the Italian group, in which we are tatting together and learning what celtic tatting is. I'm very happy that many tatters tried it. That's a wonderful way to weave together tatters! 😍

Actually it is the only tatted piece I can show you today, in fact I am on finishing the net that I started in October. I'm halfway, I hope to finish it for the end of this month. I'm embroidering or I'm weaving? As per my own literal translation, because I pass the thread through holes under and over, well, I weave!


Ciao,
Ninetta 

Tuesday, 7 July 2020

Lorella

Pattern is by Lorella Fanotti, you can find her in Facebook 

UPDATE: she posted the pattern with instructions for the needle, in her blog here:  http://macchecrochet.blogspot.com/2020/03/blog-post.html


Thread is Sanbest metallic, colour numbers 88-51 and 108.

She needle tats, while I used 4 shuttles and it was quite a puzzle!

Ciao, 
Ninetta

Tuesday, 30 June 2020

We call them nuts

I had a crazy idea in mind and started a little motif with my usual size 80 thread, but soon I realised that I'd had to switch to a bigger size! You know that I love tiny threads but those little nuts are quite indistinguishable from other elements, if you don't have a magnifying glass! They are those little bumps in the last round of the wheel  in the background in next picture.

I googled for the English name of that pile of stitches that are done in crochet, and I found that what in Italian we call "nocciolina", that is little nut (it doesn't mean the peanut in this case), it is known in English as popcorn stitch. After the title, if you were thinking of another kind of "nuts" in this blog, maybe you can be right too! 😂
So, my name for that is "tatting nuts" because I like nuts more than popcorn!

The tatted nut starts with a normal sized picot, in next pic I compared it with a treble tatting stitch that needs a very small picot (or a bare thread) to start with.
I used Cebelia DMC size 10 thread, so with this size I suggest that the very small picot would be the 1/8"  and the normal sized the 1/4" step.

Then, the tatted nut is:
- 1 treble tatting stitch (abbr. tds), followed by
- 3 second half of the treble tatting stitch

The second half of the tds starts just after the first treble tatting stitch, that is: 
Laying the picot across the ball thread, pull up a loop of thread through the same picot used to tat the first tds.
Then, take another loop of the ball thread and pull it through the previous loop.
Now slip the shuttle through the loop thus formed. Don't tighten it, yet.
Hold a loop of the core thread in the ring finger, then pass the shuttle from back to front, in space between core thread and loop, 3 times.
Tighten the ball thread and don't let the core thread slip out of place.
Then, pull the core thread.
Repeat the second half of the tds for 3 times, then, do not leave any space and tat at least one double stitch after the nut to let it pile up:
I like that new element and it can give more possibilities to create new designs 😉👍

💝💝💝💝💝
Sometimes I feel that the treble tatting stitch hasn't been well accepted by all tatters yet, but there are little episodes that make my day, for example the other day one of my aunts (that really dislike tatting because it is simple - in her own words - and highly repetitive) has looked with admiration one of my edging featuring tds. 
Another great support for me is one comment I had some time ago, that I copy here again.

craftie sylvie left that comment on my post "tatting movements and stitches":

"I believe that knitting and crochet have remained so popular because they have kept evolving and re-inventing themselves. I first heard about tatting about 13 years ago; I worked on and off for several years, and became more serious about it some 4 years ago. I think the reason for that renewed interest in me was the fact that there are many techniques still unknown to me, and the idea that creative tatters keep on inventing others. I just LOVE learning new techniques! Knitting is just two sticks around which we wrap yarn, crochet is just a hook around which we wrap yarn, but I've been a knitter and a crocheter for 45 years and I'm still passionate about knitting and crochet because there are still new "things" to do. PLEASE, just go on creating. I believe creative designers are the reason why tatting is not lost, and I'm very grateful for that 😀💚💜 "

Thank you very much, Sylvie, re-reading your words I don't feel I'm a nut anymore 💕 😘!!!

Please refer to the page "Treble Tatting Stitch - Summary" - https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/p/blog-page_95.html for any info about treble tatting stitches, thank you.

Ciao,
Ninetta 

Tuesday, 23 June 2020

m'ama non m'ama - beaded daisy chain

Daisies symbolize new beginnings! Enjoy the Summer! 🌼🌼🌼🌼🌼
"M'ama non m'ama" in Italian means "he loves me, he loves me not" and it's the famous Valentine's Day game (read about it here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/He_loves_me..._he_loves_me_not).
Who didn't pluck petals while saying that?

For my "m'ama non m'ama bracelets, I've used Sanbest metallic threads, seed beads are rocailles and miyuki delica 15/0. For the centre of the daisies, I've used Gutermann rocailles 9/0, Swarovski bicone beads and pearls 4mm.

The pattern works well with any thread of your choice.For this tutorial, I’ve used DMC Cebelia n.10. 

LEGEND
ds : double tatting stitch
SR : Split Ring

Wound 2 shuttles CTM, loading many seed beads in both shuttles (for petals).

Start the very first ring with 12 ds, with or without beads.

If you start the very first ring with 1 bead in the loop around the hand, then close the ring and the bead will be trapped at the base, between the first ds and the last ds. (see next collage, pic A)

If you start the very first ring without beads, you need to tat the second, that is a split ring, with one bead in the loop around the hand, so then when you close the split ring the bead will be trapped at the base, between the first ds and the last ds. But that will be clearer at the end of this post.

All subsequent tatted elements are split rings.
Bracelets have two elements: "the beaded diamond" and "the beaded daisy", tatted alternatively, in the sequence you like.

The beaded diamond:
SR:
- Move one bead from the first shuttle near the previous ring (pic B)
- Start the split ring with the first shuttle, with 2 beads in the loop (pic B)
- Tat 6ds. (In some bracelets I tatted SR with 8ds/8ds, but everything is still valid).
- Move one bead from the second shuttle near the previous ring (pic C).
- Move one bead in the loop near the very first ds (pic C).
- With the second shuttle, tat 6ds on the second half of the split ring (pic D)
Now, if you close the ring, the last bead in the loop will be trapped at the base (pic E)
(I designed a similar pattern in 2013 and shared a video in a tatting group in Facebook. Since then, sadly that group has been deleted.)

The beaded daisy (two SRs are required to see one daisy emerging):
FIRST SR: (see below, pic 1)
1. Start the split ring with the first shuttle, with 2 beads in the loop.
2. Tat 8ds. (In some bracelets I tatted SR with 6ds/6ds, but everything is still valid).
3. Move one bead in the loop near the very first ds.
4. With the second shuttle, tat 8ds on the second half of the split ring.

Here it is where the beaded daisy start:
5. Pick one loose bead in contrasting colour, for the centre of the daisy, and pass the crochet hook through the bead, then take the loop's thread back through the bead the opposite direction till it is big enough to pass your shuttle through it (see below, picture 2).
6. Move enough beads (3 in my example) from the first shuttle near the last tatted ds (pic 3). (**)
7. Pass the first shuttle through the loop just formed in step 5. (pic 3)
8. Slide the centre bead onto the loop, toward the first shuttle's thread, and push it till the loop around the hand is completely free again (pic 4)
9. Now, close the SR and the last bead in the loop will be trapped at the base. (pic 5)
10. Pull the first shuttle to "close" the first half side of the daisy (pic 6).
(Note that the thread loop inside the SR is blocked between the orange bead and the first side of the SR.)
SECOND SR: 
11. Start the split ring with the first shuttle, with 2 beads in the loop (pic 7)
12. Before starting the very first ds, join the thread: that is pull a loop of the thread around the hand through the very small space between the seed beads and the centre bead, pass the shuttle through it and tension (pic 8).
13. Tat 8ds. (In some bracelets I tatted SR with 6ds/6ds, but everything is still valid).
14. Move enough beads (3 in my example) from the second shuttle near the previous ring (see it on the left of pic 1 and also the next picture below, with the Swarovski bicone). (**)
15. Move one bead in the loop near the very first ds.
16. With the second shuttle, tat 8ds on the second half of the split ring (pic 1)

Now, if you close the split ring, the last bead in the loop will be trapped at the base (like in pic E) and the next element will be a beaded diamond. 
If you don't close the split ring, you can start another beaded daisy, restarting from FIRST SR, step 5 (like in pic 2).

(**)For the centre of the daisy with Gutermann rocailles 9/0, I've moved 3 beads in step 6 and 14.
With Swarovski bicone beads and pearls 4mm, I've moved 5 beads in step 6 and 14.

Don't forget step 12!!!
Ciao,
Ninetta

Tuesday, 16 June 2020

pattern for the tiffany bezel

That is the pattern for tatting around a rivoli 14mm with a thread size 20, the same that I showed in previous post:
https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/2020/06/tiffany-bezel.html

I've used Sanbest metallic 4 strands, colour number 121, a rivoli Swarovski Peridot 14mm, and 8 miyuki delica seed beads 15/0.

(In theory, with slight modifications, the pattern could be adapted to different size for rivoli and thread.)

LEGEND
ds : double tatting stitch
tds : treble tatting stitch
b : bead 
vsp : very small picot
R : ring
SR : Split Ring
vsp : very small picot

Wound 2 shuttles CTM, loading 8 beads in the core shuttle.

Start a ring:
Notice that this ring starts directly with treble tatting stitches:
https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/2019/02/jumping-in-place-starting-without-very.html

R (put 1b in the loop): 3tds,b,3tds,b,3tds,b,3tds,b,3tds,b,3tds,b,3tds,b,2tds,vsp,1ds.

Close the ring and climb out in this way:
- Take a loop of the core shuttle's thread, through the last very small picot.
- Then, take another loop of the core thread and pull it through the previous loop. 
- Slip the other shuttle through the loop thus formed. 
- Pull the core shuttle tight. 
Then, there's the back side, that is all rings:
SR: 6ds / 6ds
R: 6ds, join to the next hidden picot (same place of each bead underneath), 6ds.
Repeat R for 6 times.
- Insert the rivoli -
Finish with a split ring:
SR: 6ds (join to the last hidden picot) / 6ds.

To insert the earrings' post, I used the same method that I used for the earrings in the "Parure Anne", that I explained here: https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/2020/06/parure-anne-with-pattern.html#Anneorrearringspattern
That is:
SR (name it A): 8ds-8ds
SR (name it B): 8ds-8ds
Multiple onion ring:
innermost ring: 6ds-6ds.
second inner ring: 8ds, onion ring join, picot, 8ds.
outer/third SPLIT ring: 12ds, onion ring join, picot, 12ds.
Finish with a small ring of 8 double stitches (I ended with the SSSR method by Miranda).

Assembling:
Insert the small ring, from front to back inside the SR named A, then pick up the post and put it between the multiple onion ring and the SR named B, then inside the small ring.
I finished it sewing small ring and SR B together with a needle, using 2 strands of my thread.

Ciao,
Ninetta
UPDATE: Please refer to the page "Treble Tatting Stitch - Summary" - https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/p/blog-page_95.html for any info about treble tatting stitches, thank you.

Thank you very much for all your nice comments.

Ciao
Ninetta