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Dear Reader,
I share here what I like and what works for me. If you've been following me, you know that I can change my mind from time to time, and feel free to comment that I'm completely wrong, you may be right. I'm not running a business. I'm not paid and have never received any compensation or facilitation for any review/brand/site here mentioned. In case one day we'll ever meet, I'll be the one offering you a cup of Italian coffee, too.
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Tuesday, 2 June 2020

Parure “Anne” - with pattern

I’ve been updating my tutorials' and patterns’ pages, with links and pictures. Please if you find any oversight from my side, leave a comment in the corresponding blog post. Thank you very much for your help.
🌸🌸🌸🌸🌸🌸🌸🌸🌸

For tatting the bracelet, I’ve followed almost Anne Orr's pattern for an edging. It is from J&P Coats Crochet, Cross Stitch & Tatting Book #14, 1923. (Tatting is at pages 7 and 8.)
The edging is the fourth starting from the top, at page 7:
https://www.georgiaseitz.com/public/anneorr/book14/ao_p_7.jpg
To have the inner ring coloured (blue in my sample), split rings are tatted with 3 shuttles, two of them are for the split rings, the third shuttle/thread is hidden inside the reverse side of the SR, and it is used to tat the inner ring.
I tatted my bracelet with only 2 shuttles, the inner ring is tatted and joined to the outer ring using the same method that I explained here: Anne Orr's Slip Join (AOSJ) – pics 43 & 44
 
In the next, numbers without other indications are double stitches’ count.
ds = double stitch
- = picot
+ = normal up join
R = ring
SR = split ring
OR = onion ring
AOSJ = Anne Orr's Slip Join
SSSR = single shuttle split ring

Anne Orr’s pattern for edging with split onion rings:
SR: 8-1- (stop and then tat 1-8 ds after the reversed side) / 9 [R:10 AOSJ 10] 9.
Repeat for the desired length.

My bracelet’s pattern:
Bicones and pearls are 4mm. Thread is Sanbest col.num. 108 (4 strands, very similar to a size 20 cotton thread). I put the beads using this method: Bead in face-inward picot https://flic.kr/p/mTMZeB
Start with a ring: 12.
SR: 9- (stop and then tat 9 ds after the reversed side) / 9, [inner R:4, insert bead, 4, AOSJ 4, join the picot for bead, 4 ], 9.
Repeat split rings for the desired length.
Finish with a ring: 12.

I usually use this method to finish the last ring of my bracelets: Finishing with SSSR (http://tattingfool.blogspot.com/2011/07/finishing-with-sssr.html)

**************************************
The pendant’s pattern starts with an onion ring with true rings (https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/2020/04/the-onion-dilemma.html):

Onion ring:
- Inner ring: R:4, insert bicone, 4, AOSJ 4, join the picot for bicone, 4.
- Outer ring: 6-6-6 onion ring join 6-6-6

Then I climbed to the second round in the same way I used for the "square medallion in leaf design", described here: https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/2020/05/mock-and-split-but-still-genuine.html.
Rings’ stitches count in the second round is the same as the central true onion rings, but they are all split onion rings, like in the bracelet and in the Anne Orr’s "square medallion in leaf design".
(Note for myself: this second round needs a drawing)

Then I climbed to a third round (the first bigger ring is a split ring):
SR: 6-6; Repeat for 3 times.
SR: 6 / 3, [bigger ring: 6, insert pearl, 2+8+2, join the picot for pearl, 6], 3. (bigger ring is joined twice to the second round)
Repeat all around,
then finish with a round of Chains: 8, lock join to split rings’ base.

The pendant ends with a split chain and a multiple onion ring, that is 3 true onion rings and one mock ring (“6.2.2 Inner and median true rings and outer mock ring”, it is for 3 rings but it is the same method with 4 concentric rings).

I “copied” the idea from Muskaan, who used a folded multiple onion ring to have a loop/hook where passing the chain through (Thank you Muskaan!). This is the link to her original post: https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2015/04/parallel-tracks.html

Curled onion ring:
innermost ring: 6-6.
second inner ring: 8 onion ring join, picot, 8.
third inner ring: 12 onion ring join, picot, 12.
outer mock ring: 14 onion ring join, picot, 14.
Fold it over and tie threads.

The necklace is a line of split rings, all are 8-8.

**************************************
Earrings’ pattern:
The earrings’s onion rings are tatted with the same stitches’ count of the bracelet.
It starts with an onion ring:
Inner ring: R:4, insert pearl, 4, AOSJ 4, join the picot for pearl, 4.
Outer ring: 18 onion ring join 18.
SR: 9- (stop and then tat 9 ds after the reversed side) / 9, [inner R:4, insert bead, 4, AOSJ 4, join the picot for bead, 4 ], 9.
SR (name it A): 8-8
SR (name it B): 8-8
Multiple onion ring:
innermost ring: 6-6.
second inner ring: 8 onion ring join, picot, 8.
outer/third ring: 12 onion ring join, picot, 12.
Finish with a small ring of 8 double stitches (I ended with the SSSR method by Miranda).

Then, to insert the earrings’ post, please look at next pictures: insert the small rings, from front to back inside the SR named A, then pick up the post and put it between the multiple onion ring and the SR named B, then inside the small ring.
I finished it sewing small ring and SR B together with a needle, using 2 strands of my thread.

That is a close up of the earrings, front and back:


Ciao,
Ninetta

Tuesday, 26 May 2020

whichever way you choose

This post is part of a series.
In this last part, you’ll find two chapters:
-->The 6th chapter is about which way you tat outer rings. How the final onion ring looks if we tat clockwise, compared to the other way? When it is convenient a change of direction?
-->The 7th chapter is about elements of design. That is, for example, can the inner ring be block tatting and can we still call it onion ring? I learned that the central inner ring can be substituted with other elements, since I found tatters who tats Cluny Onion Ring.

6. Direction of tatting

Note: words “clockwise” and “counterclockwise” are referring to the direction of tatting, if you look at it from the front side.

All methods in previous Parts have the outermost rings that run clockwise. For example, in chapter 2, the outer ring is a chain tatted from the front side of the work, in clockwise direction, that is the the working direction.

6.1 Outer ring in counterclockwise direction (Alligator Join)

I messaged with Sue Hanson before starting this series, about the old German method by Tina Frauberger (see Part III parag. 2.1) and how Georgia Seitz and their tatting friends started calling those concentric rings in the way we call them nowadays: onions probably became tatted onions from 2001 on... Then, Sue shared with me her way to close the outer mock ring, using the Alligator join.

The Alligator join is also called Under and Over Join.

That is not a new method, it is just another way to close a chain over itself. In Elgiva Nicholls’s “Tatting – History and techniques” there’s a paragraph where this method is described, and it’s entitled “The running scroll”.

For a tutorial about the Under and Over Join, please read this one by Muskaan:
https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2018/05/mock-rings-1-under-and-over-join.html

Jane Eborall shares her drawing here: http://www.janeeborall.freeservers.com/AJoin.pdf

There's a reason to prefer the Alligator Join in onion mock rings and it depends if the onion ring is free in your current pattern; it should not have to be joined to a previous element.
It isn’t a constraint: in case you really like this method, and you want to use it in any pattern, Muskaan comes to rescue you: in the same tutorial linked above, she shows us how to manoeuvre if the ring needs to be attached to a previous element.

Compare this method with:
2.1 Inner true ring with core thread (first shuttle), mock ring with ball thread (or second shuttle)
in  Part III


In next picture:
First shuttle = core shuttle (yellow thread)
Second shuttle = "ball" shuttle (red thread).

Differences with the method described in Part III:
  • The inner ring is tatted from the frontside with first shuttle (currently the yellow - core thread’s shuttle). The inner ring won’t tip over. 
  • The outer chain is tatted normally, as though it was a continuation of a basic pattern – a line of rings and chains. To join the inner ring, I did a lock join (optional).
  • The outer chain turns around and over the inner ring, to comply with the direction of the mock ring that is emerging counterclockwise – if you look at it from frontside.
I tatted the chain from backside with reverse order stitches; but in the picture you see the frontside of the work.
Planning the direction is important when we follow visual patterns: if you use this method, you should pay attention and start the double stitches' count from the right side of the drawn outermost ring.

⇒⇒⇒ Closing the outer ring with the Alligator join:⇐⇐⇐
To close the mock ring, (working from the back side) put the shuttle thread above and ball thread under the base of inner ring (if you exchange threads, the yellow/core thread would be visible from front side).  That is, the Alligator Join.

Then, tension both threads and continue tatting the next chain as per your pattern. 

6.2 Onions with three concentric rings

In the next pictures:
First shuttle = core shuttle (red thread)
Second shuttle = "ball" shuttle (yellow thread).

Pattern (ds= double stitch):
Inner ring: 5ds, picot, 5ds.
Median ring: 5ds, picot, 5ds, join to inner ring, 5ds, picot, 5ds.
Outer ring: 7ds, join to median ring, picot, 7ds, join to median ring, picot, 7ds, join to median ring, picot, 7ds.

We have many choices, and in the next there’s only a subset. I leave it to you to discover other possibilities.

6.2.1) Three true rings (like in Part I and II):
Everything in Part I and in Part II is still valid. In next pic you see only one example.

6.2.2) Inner and median true rings and outer mock ring (like in Part III):
In this case, treat inner and median rings like only one ring. Everything in Part III is still valid for the outermost mock ring.
(Hint for more options: alternatively, you can use the method “counterclockwise” described in previous paragraph 6.1.)

In next pic you see only one example (please refer to pictures from 16 to 19 in Part III).
For the JSS, please see pictures from 6 to 9 in Part II.
 
6.2.3)  Inner ring as a true ring and both median and outer rings as mock rings: method A
In this case, the inner ring is tatted from the frontside with first shuttle (currently the red - core thread’s shuttle).
The median chain is tatted as though it was a continuation of a line of rings and chains. I tatted the chain from backside with reverse order stitches; but in next pic you see the frontside of the work.
Till this point, it is equal to the method described in previous paragraph 6.1.
Then, to close the median mock ring, lock join to the base. That switches threads so that the yellow thread is the core thread for the outer mock rings.

The outer mock ring is tatted from the frontside, here I closed it at its base with a lock join.

6.2.4)  Inner ring as a true ring and both median and outer rings as mock rings: method B
In this case, I tatted the inner ring with my first shuttle (currently the red - core thread’s shuttle). I tatted reversed stitches because that is the backside for me (but this is optional).

Then, the ball (yellow) thread has been moved on the back, that is to comply with the direction of the thread that is coming from last second half stitch (but, if my last chain had the first half stitch visible on the front side, then I would had moved the thread on the front). Notice that when I'm going to start the mock ring, I pull the first shuttle thread, and the inner ring tips over.

I tatted the median chain from the frontside, clockwise direction. Till this point, it is equal to the method “2.1 Inner true ring with core thread (first shuttle), mock ring with ball thread (or second shuttle)”, (please refer to pictures from 16 to 19 in Part III).
Then, to close the median mock ring, here I chose to do the Alligator Join, that is put the shuttle thread under and ball thread over the base of inner ring. The Alligator Join let me continue with the next outer ring in a smooth way.
Outer ring: tension well and start the outer mock ring. I chose to close the outer mock ring at its base with an onion ring join.

&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

In the next collage, the two methods A and B compared side by side:
My very personal choice goes to the more compact look.

7. Elements of design in onion rings

Warning: The title is misleading: the Onion Ring  IS  an element of design in tatting.

But, for the sake of curiosity, for example, can the inner ring be block tatting? It seems that tatters already answered to that question, in fact, I learned that the central inner ring can be substituted with other elements, like in the Cluny Onion Ring.

And not only clunies have been put inside rings: in one of her patterns, Muskaan put double true rings inside a mock ring (shared here: https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2017/05/journey-of-single-shuttle.html ).
(I think there is another designer that put 2 rings inside a bigger ring in a pattern, but in this moment I can’t remember the name)

7.1 Cluny Onion Ring

Basically, you tat the Cluny leaf, then you tat a chain around it, that closes at its base and becomes a mock ring, joining the opposite end of the leaf with the alligator join.

References:
Victats: Boo-yah ghost: https://victats.blogspot.com/2019/10/boo-yah-ghost.html
Muskaan: 2-Tone Cluny Bracelet: https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2018/09/clunied.html

In the next pictures:
First shuttle = core shuttle (yellow thread)
Second shuttle = "ball" shuttle (red thread).

Pattern in my example (mixing both patterns above):
(I started with a ring: 5ds, picot,5ds; then chain: 3ds, picot, 3ds.)
Cluny is 12 wraps.
Wind loom with core shuttle and weave the Cluny leaf with second shuttle; let the second shuttle emerging from the right side (tip by Muskaan), then use it as core thread for the chain.
Outer mock ring/chain: leave a very small picot, then 14ds, Alligator Join to the beginning/base of Cluny, then 14ds.
To close the mock ring, I did an onion ring join.

>>>>>> The next one could be called Split Cluny Onion Ring: <<<<<<
All clunies are 12 wraps.
Wind loom with core shuttle and weave tally with second shuttle; let the second shuttle emerging from the right side (tip by Muskaan), then use it for making the loop around the hand.
Outer split ring: (make the loop around the hand with the second shuttle) leave a very small bare thread (for tolerance), 14ds. For the second side, with the first shuttle, leave a very small bare thread, then 14 reverse order reversed double stitches. To block the base of Cluny, I trapped the base of the leaf with an Alligator Join, between last reversed double stich and a reversed second half stitch, on the second side of the split ring.

In the next picture:
Sh1 = First shuttle = core shuttle (yellow thread)
Sh2 = Second shuttle = "ball" shuttle (red thread).
AJ = Alligator Join
rors = reverse order reverse stitches
rshs = reverse second half stitch


🧅🧅🧅🧅🧅🧅🧅🧅🧅🧅

All in all, I know my limits and this series is not all-inclusive. It’s my vade-mecum and I hope you will find it useful for your next onion rings projects, whichever way you prefer.

The sense of this last part is that any different method can be tuned to the pattern you’re going to face, the ultimate choice can be the designer’s or – if you feel adventurous – it’s up to you. A simple hint from my side is that you can tat your own samples, to use as future reference.

Many thanks to all those who chose to share, in tutorials, forum, videos and elsewhere online, thanks to all people mentioned in this series. Thanks to them I, in turn, can learn and share. Someone said that we are like dwarves on the shoulders of the giants that preceded us, that is true for whatever you learn and for tatting, too.

Ciao,
Ninetta

Tuesday, 19 May 2020

the onion takes dimension

This post is part of a series.
In previous ‘episodes’ of the Onion Saga, I described methods to obtain concentric rings on the plane. That are the most tatted onion rings ever. But there are some nice variations that can be used in 3D tatting, that is onion rings can take dimensions and can be layered, perpendicular, curled and – why not? – twisted...
Once Muskaan wrote that “Universe is made of swirls and curls” and, especially at that time, I was not in the position to differ 😉 (her “little ditty” is here: https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2015/05/tatting-technique-curled-rings-concept.html

In the next pictures:
First shuttle = core shuttle (red thread)
Second shuttle = "ball" shuttle (yellow thread).

5. layered and 3D onions

5.1 Layered Onion rings

Reference:
I found the original method only in one pattern by Muskaan, here:
https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.in/2017/03/marigolds-in-row.html
Her photo-tutorial is in the same post.

Before starting, I’ve tatted one onion ring with true rings (like I did in Part I) to compare. In this method inner and outer rings are true rings, too.

In fig. 57, I've already tatted the inner ring from frontside, as per my pattern (5ds, picot, 5ds). Then, following Muskaan’s instructions, I folded the inner ring forward and started outer ring at base from behind.

I did the onion ring join, but I didn’t follow Muskaan’s tip to make only the second half stitch after the join; instead, I left the space for the picot and continued with a complete ds.
As you see in both pictures numbered 58, the inner ring is slightly layered over the outermost ring. That is a pretty change for patterns that need depth. Here in my pattern it is a shallow depth though, like a delicate bas-relief.


5.2 Perpendicular (3D) Onion Rings

Reference:
I found the original method only in one pattern by Muskaan, here:
https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2014/09/tatting-pattern-tiny-heart-poppy-part-2.html
Her corresponding tutorial is here:
https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2014/11/perpendicular-concentriconion-rings.html

Also in this method, inner and outer rings are true rings. Even if Muskaan's tutorial is about Josephine Rings, I tatted a perpendicular onion rings with normal rings.

I tatted the inner true ring with the core (red) shuttle, then the outer true ring with the yellow (ball) shuttle. In that way, the second ring is already in the right position to turn at a right angle (90˚) to the inner ring.

In fig. 59,  I’ve already tatted the inner ring from the frontside (5ds, picot, 5ds). Then, I followed Muskaan’s instructions: “I brought the yellow thread in front, to 'midpoint' of inner ring & made the loop for the outer ring over and across the base”. The red thread has to be posted through the yellow loop,  the loop should be around the inner ring.

(fig. 60) For the outer ring, I didn’t follow my pattern, in fact I tatted 7ds then joined inner ring and tatted 7ds more, then I closed the ring.

In fig. 61, I did the onion ring join, then I left the space for the picot and continued with a complete ds.
Muskaan shared ideas for where this perpendicular onion rings can be used: in place of beads, for buds, pistils... well you should read her tutorial for more!


5.3 Curled Onion rings

Reference:
The original method can be found in a simple clover edging pattern, here:
https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/2015/04/pride-and-prejudice.html
(visual drawing in png format is here: https://flic.kr/p/rYfoJw )
(visual drawing in jpg format is here: https://flic.kr/p/2hN6kc7 )

The tutorial was kindly offered by Muskaan and it is here:
https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2015/05/more-options-curly-pattern.html

In fig. 63 I’ve already tatted a normal onion ring with true rings (in the way showed in Part I), then I curled both rings over the base (toward the tatter) and passed the hook through the picot, pulled a loop of chain’s thread (that is the yellow ‘ball’ shuttle) and made a normal join with the other shuttle.

5.4 Small curled onion rings

Reference:
The original method is in my tutorial, here:
http://www.georgiaseitz.com/2016/ninettaalternatemethodsofcurlingrings.pdf
(in the pdf there’s a missing link to this file with patterns:
BraceletsCapriccio.pdf  : http://www.georgiaseitz.com/2016/ninettabraceletscapriccio.pdf )


Well, a Small Curled Ring (abbr. sCR) tatted inside a normal ring can be considered a sort of layered/3D onion rings. I’ve used the technique in one of my bookmarks (but I’ve not shared the pattern yet):
https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/2015/06/solution-or-pollution.html

If you need a short refresh (without reading the pdf):
  • the sCR ring and the normal ring start at the same point (like onion rings)
  • the sCR is made before the normal ring
  • the sCR is tatted with the second shuttle, front side view
  • the sCR starts close to the last tatted element in the pattern (otherwise a bare thread space changes the stability of the sCR)
  • the sCR is made normally, with at least one picot that is used for the curling (stitches’ count here it is 4ds, picot, 4ds)
  • (fig. 65) at the point where the picot has to be, the first shuttle’s thread is put in front of the sCR and passed through the loop around the hand, with a first half stitch movement 
  • the picot can vary in size, that determines the ultimate shape of the curve. Picot here it is a very small one.
  • the sCR ring is closed normally
  • the normal ring is tatted with the first shuttle (stitches’ count here it is 8ds, picot, 8ds) 
  • (fig. 66 & 67) The outer ring’s loop around the hand is formed with the picot of the sCR "trapped" inside the picot.
  • when the normal ring is closed, the picot is blocked at the base, folding the sCR over itself (fig.68)
  • after closing the normal ring, no matter what the next element in the pattern is, I recommend to tat at least 1 ds chain to keep the sCR in its position.

😎The "Small Curled Onion Ring” in pictures from 69 to 73 was found almost simultaneously by Muskaan and it's explained in my tutorial and also here:
https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2016/04/trials-and-tribulations.html

In this case there are 2 sCR nested inside the outermost normal ring, giving that triple onion ring effect.

For the first sCR, you’d follow the same method described in pictures 65 and 66. Then start a second sCR with the first shuttle’s thread but:

(fig. 69 & 70) at the point where the picot has to be, the second shuttle’s thread is just posted from back to front inside the picot loop around the hand (not fhs movement here). (this the same movement done in the Anne Orr’s “square medallion” of previous post - Part V)

The first sCR is 4ds, picot, 4ds ; the second sCR is 8ds, picot (with the second shuttle’s thread inside), 8ds. The outermost ring is 10ds, picot, 10ds.

(fig. 71) Then start the outer ring. Put fingers inside the second shuttle’s loop and put it around the hand. Leave a bare thread space (for tolerance) and start a normal ring. In the example it is 10ds, picot, 10ds. I recommend to tat at least 1 ds chain to keep both the sCR in their position.

I’m puzzled for not having a pattern of mine with that last lovely effect, that’s something to think about.

🧅🧅🧅🧅🧅🧅🧅🧅🧅🧅

I’ve still something to add, about the direction of tatting and something else that I left out in previous parts. But I’m afraid that current post would be too much long.
It’s difficult dimensioning a blog post, there’s times when you have just one picture and others when you feel you didn’t say everything you had planned. So... sorry, there will be another “chapter” next week, the last one - I promise.

I look forward to hearing from you, if you think there is something to clarify, please leave me a comment, I would love it.

... To be continued!

Ciao,
Ninetta

Tuesday, 12 May 2020

mock and split but still genuine

This post is part of a series.
(Note: I updated Part II to add the link to the the step-by-step tutorial by Muskaan for the Captured Onion Ring, Kathleen Minniti's method:
https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2020/05/captured-onion-rings.html)


To summarize, Onion Rings are concentric rings that can be tatted with:
  1. all true rings  (Part I, and variations Part II)
  2. inner true ring and outer mock ring (three methods: Part III and Part IV)
  3. all mock rings (this post)
(Scroll down for an additional chapter, about Split Onion Rings)

3. Tatting onion rings with all mock rings

Almost every ring can be done as a mock ring, needle tatters know that. There are exceptions, there are patterns that won’t look the same if you tat all mock rings in place of rings. But, as an exercise or just to try it, it would be a funny game to shuttle tat a pattern in that way. For example, even the basic flower/all rings will look different: with mock rings the hole in the center would be littler or rather disappear! Also, the tension may vary (between ring and mock ring with the same stitches’ count) and the method used to close the mock ring affects the final look (for a visual summary of the methods used to close a mock ring, here it is a drawing: https://flic.kr/p/24D988b).

In the next there is only one example, I’m showing how I substituted both concentric rings with mock rings, that is very similar to a needle tatting method.

Inner and outer mock rings with core thread

At this point of my tutorial, just before starting the onion ring, the core shuttle is that one with the yellow thread and the second/ball shuttle is that one with the red thread. I used two shuttles, after finishing the chain I reversed work and exchanged shuttles, the red thread acting as the working shuttle, that is because I wanted the mock rings in yellow.

(fig. 36) I tatted the inner mock ring from the frontside but with tatted reversed stitches (but this is optional) because that will be the backside for me. In fact, at the next step...
... (fig. 37, 38, 39) I tatted the outer mock ring from the frontside too. I took the loop for the mock ring, then the consequence of pulling threads is that the inner mock ring tips over.
In my opinion, you don't need to tie a knot to keep those rings closed, rather making the knots would add bulk to the base of the onion ring.

In fig. 40, the onion ring is finished, and it is still genuine 😁

🧅Now that you have all the recipes, you can have fun and choose according to your tastes!
But let’s add spices...

The ‘Onion Saga’ continues with...

4. Anne Orr’s lesson on Split Onion Rings

I learned a lot, tatting the "square medallion in leaf design", Anne Orr's pattern, from J&P Coats Crochet, Cross Stitch & Tatting Book #14, 1923. The square is at page 8 (Courtesy by Georgia Seitz, this publication is available here: http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art30942.asp )

Here it is the link to my tatting: https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/2020/03/square-medallion-in-leaf-design.html . I’ve already uploaded a diagram in Flickr: https://flic.kr/p/2iF7KhX.

I followed the original instructions and started from the center ring. Then I climbed out with a mock picot and tatted four elements that nowadays we call Split Onion Rings.

Aurora Lozada shared her method to tat Split Onion Ring that uses Double Core Single Shuttle Split Rings, you can find her pdf here:
http://www.georgiaseitz.com/2014/auroralozadamethodonionring.pdf
(Also, Aurora found an alternate way to tat the square medallion centre, with normal onion rings: https://tathelper.blogspot.com/2020/04/an-onion-ring-challenge-i-havent-tatted.html)

But following Anne Orr’s instructions, you tat split onion rings, using the shuttle on the second side (that one with reversed stitches) for tatting the inner ring, as though it was a ‘face inward’ floating/thrown-off ring.

I used two coloured threads, to better show the steps and to make it clear when I switched shuttle. But the pattern asks for two shuttles CTM (Continuous Thread Method).

It has been tatted all from the frontside. If you looked at my drawing in Flickr, I used two colors up there too.
In fig.41 I already tatted the center ring (3picots separated by 2ds), then left a short bare space and started the first split onion ring, but that side with normal stitches temporarily stops at the point where the join with the inner ring will be done (5ds, picot, 5ds).
As you see in fig. 42, with the other shuttle, at this point I tatted one second half stitch not flipped. This way, the red thread is blocked and already in the right position to start the inner ring.

In fig. 43 I tatted 4ds then there is the join, that in Anne’s original instruction was “pass shuttle No. 1 under thread on hand to make joining”, and actually it means that you should post the shuttle used for the split ring through the loop of the inner ring, from back to front, in that way the shuttle’s thread will be trapped into the picot of the inner ring (fig.44). There will be a smooth join point.

(This reminded me the method I found myself to curl those "small curled rings", with the other thread trapped into a picot... we've always reinvented the wheel

Then I tatted 4ds more and closed the inner ring. To come back to the split ring second side, I tatted one first half stitch not flipped (fig.45) and then (fig.46) continued with the 5 reversed stitches requested. (It's your choice to count the two half stiches - fig.42&45 - as one double and subtract it from the next, I didn't.)
In fig. 47, you see that I resumed the “flipped” side of the split ring and finished it (leave space for a picot, 5ds, picot, 5ds).

In fig. 48 there is the second “split onion ring”. It is quite the same, except that before starting the inner ring I joined the center ring.
(fig 49) I used this method: http://janeeborall.freeservers.com/JoinSecondSideSR.pdf.
(the join replaces that one second half stitch that I did in the first element, see pic 42)
After the join, I started the inner ring and (fig.50) at the middle point I passed the other shuttle through the loop. In fig. 51 you can see the inner ring closed and the yellow thread trapped into the picot.

Then I did the same as in the first element, that is (fig. 52) one first half stitch not flipped and continued with the second side of the split ring (fig.53).

(fig. 54) The third split onion ring is equal to the second.
(fig. 55 and 56) The fourth split onion ring differs because the thread must end out in position to start the next round in the square medallion.

It’s been a great lesson for me, a challenging but beautiful pattern, really original and modern in its construction. I love this design.

🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹

Next chapter in the “Onion Saga” will be a potpourri of options for layered and tridimensional onion rings, and I think that it will be the last part of this series (or the second last). Also, there is something else to say about the direction of tatting in the "outer mock ring" method (inner ring and outer chain - Part III) that's useful to remember when tatting "detached" onion rings or more than 2 concentric rings.  But if you think there is still something missing, please leave me a comment, thank you very much.

... To be continued!

Ciao,
Ninetta

Tuesday, 5 May 2020

onion rings – not fried yet

This post is part of a series.
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After 3 post about onion rings, I’m pretty sure we – me included – have sufficient options to tat onion rings like a professional! But I am not totally fried 😁 after all the hours I’ve been spending online to study onion rings! And I’m still finding infos new to me!

I've found a German site, author is the tatter and researcher Christel Wutzmer: http://doppelknoten.gmxhome.de/
In her site you can read a short bio of Tina Frauberger, where I learned that in 1892 Tina married Heinrich Frauberger, who was also the founder and director of the Düsseldorf Museum of Decorative Arts. Now I understood why the references to the museum in her book Shiffchenspitze (1919)... unfortunately I can’t read German. What it’s very sad, it is that from Christel Wutzmer’s site I’ve learned that Tina’s “...lace and embroidery collection was auctioned off after her death. Part of her estate was probably burned in the turmoil of war...” (the World War II, she died in 1937).

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UPDATE: here it is a short bio written by J.Connors in Craftree:
 https://craftree.com/forum/threadfs/39087
--------------

Another interesting thing that I found online, it is this drawing:
It is incredible how many times you can open a book/pdf and don't really "see" things! Till that particular moment when you realise that what you were looking for was already there! That picture is from page 27 of a Finnish book, available online, a reprint of a 1923 German book (I found the info in M.Leigh Martin site, thanks very much! - here: http://www.somethingunderthebed.com/CURTAIN/REVIEWStat/LANG1.html).
It is very interesting that the join to connect inner and outer ring is very similar to the join I was trying to describe in last post and that I will try to show later here with another drawing.
***********************************

This post is the continuation from previous post, the method of tatting onion rings with inner true ring and outermost mock ring(s). Recap, we have at least 3 choices:
  1. Inner true ring with first shuttle (core thread), mock ring with second shuttle (or ball thread) (described here: peeling the onion without crying – Part III)
  2. Inner true ring with second shuttle, mock ring with first shuttle
  3. Both Inner true ring and mock ring with second shuttle, that is both with the same thread (colour).
In this post I am showing you how I tat the second and third way in the list.
For these methods, I usually tat the inner ring from the backside, and the chain (the mock ring) from the front side.

In the next:
First shuttle = core shuttle (warning: when I switch shuttles, core thread will be a different color!)
Second shuttle = "ball" shuttle.
With these two methods, one shuttle and the ball are not sufficient, you will need two shuttles. It will be soon clear the reason why.

2.2 Inner true ring with second shuttle, mock ring with first shuttle

At this point of my tutorial, the core shuttle is that one with the yellow thread. So the second “ball” shuttle is that one with the red thread.

Reference: Muskaan described this method in her pictures 10, 11 and 12 in this blog post: https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2017/03/revisiting-options.html 

I reproduced it in my pictures from 25 to 30.

=> In this method, the roles of core and ball thread are exchanged, that is the ball thread (red shuttle) will be used to tat the inner ring in the same way we usually tat floating (thrown off) rings (that is written also in Muskaan’s post). That is the main reason why you need two working shuttles.

I tatted the inner ring (pic 25) with my second shuttle (currently the red is the “ball” shuttle). I tatted reversed stitches because that is the backside for me (but this is optional).
In pic 26, I reversed work to tat the outer mock ring (that is a chain) from the frontside. The yellow thread is already in the right position to start the chain, using the red as core thread.

When I start the chain, I notice two things:
  1. I pull the red thread, and the inner ring tips over.
  2. I don’t leave any loop or space at the start of the mock ring (unlike a “standard” mock ring).
In pic 27 I’m joining rings. There are many possible alternatives for the join, here I chose to use the JSS (“Join to smooth side”). Read previous post (part III) for other options.

⇒⇒⇒ Closing the outer ring:⇐⇐⇐

Here I wanted to switch shuttles (colours) to have next chain in red. I have many options, read about color choices in previous post (part III).
(look at pic. 28, 29 and 30) I pull a loop of yellow thread as if making a normal join, and pass the red shuttle through it, then I tension the yellow thread, to make the red loop pop on the back. This makes shuttles (colours) switch automatically (you can see the chain in red in pic 30).

Muskaan used a similar join in a two-colours block tatting, in order to make the join and to switch shuttles at the same time. For explanation purpose, she called it “block/ball join”. This is the link to her post: https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2017/02/heart-to-heart-to-heart-to.html

 

Please, refer also to the lower part of my drawing in Flickr: https://flic.kr/p/bvs5GV.

***** Remember the drawing from the old Finnish book? In that old one the loop of core thread was pulled from back to front (and it was used to join inner and outer mock ring), in this one it is pulled from front to back (and I've used it to close the outer ring). They are very similar, if not the same join, up and down. *****

--------------
UPDATE: there is a thread in Craftree started by Muskaan, where she described a join that looks exactly the same when done, like that one in the old book. Another way to obtain the same join.
http://www.craftree.com/forum/threadfs/9110
--------------

2.3 Both Inner true ring and mock ring with second shuttle, that is both with the same thread (colour)

Please look at next pictures from 31 to 35.
The roles of core and ball thread are exchanged in this method, too, that is the ball thread (red shuttle) will be used to tat the inner ring in the same way we usually tat floating (thrown off) rings.

I already tatted the inner ring with my second shuttle before taking picture 31 (currently the red is the “ball” shuttle, in reversed stitches but this is optional).

Then I reversed work to tat the outer mock ring (that actually is a chain) from the frontside.
In pic 31, after passing the yellow (core) thread in front, I tatted one first half stitch, then moved it very close to last stitch in previous chain, then continued with the chain (pic. 32). In order to have a better fold of the chain in the starting point, the very first double stitch should have been replaced by 2 first half stitches followed by one second half stitch (like the way we change direction in the folded rings/chains - Martha Ess's way).

⇒⇒⇒ Closing the outer ring:⇐⇐⇐

In picture 33 and 34, I didn’t want to switch shuttles (colours), in order to have next chain in red (read about color choices in previous post, part III).
Then, like I did in pic 20 & 21 of previous post, I used the “onion ring join” (that is like the “S&RJ – slope & roll join”), a normal join taking a loop from the ball thread and passing the core shuttle into it, without tensioning the ball thread: in this way the core thread still slides and both thread are already in the right position to start the next chain (in red in pic 35).

🍟🍟🍟 🍟🍟🍟 🍟🍟🍟 🍟🍟🍟 🍟🍟🍟


😊😅
There’s more to say about onion rings, for example I still have to tell you how both rings can be tatted like mock rings. Then, I also would like adding some layered and 3D effects... but all that is for the next post!

If you liked my onion rings till now, please leave me any comment, I will love it.💖

... To be continued!

Ciao,
Ninetta

Tuesday, 28 April 2020

peeling the onion without crying

This post is part of a series.
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My feeling is that the “all true rings” method is tricky for beginners, especially for finding the right tension in the two rings. My tatting is always very tight, and the outermost rings seems always stuck to the previous. But, I think, even expert tatters tend to tension more rings than chains, so, if you’re looking for a denser effect, then the true rings is just the method you need.

There's no need to struggle with a method,  when we have many ways to tat the same pattern. (Remember the "square medallion" design by Anne Orr? Aurora Lozada found  another way to tat the centre: https://tathelper.blogspot.com/2020/04/an-onion-ring-challenge-i-havent-tatted.html)

There are always many ways to peel the onions, without crying.

I think that the simplest method is tatting the inner ring with a true ring and all subsequent rings like mock rings, that is chains. But the final effect is a little different.

2. Tatting onion rings with inner true ring and outermost mock ring(s)

Mainly we have 3 choices:
  1. Inner true ring with first shuttle (core thread), mock ring with second shuttle (or ball thread)
  2. Inner true ring with second shuttle, mock ring with first shuttle
  3. Both Inner true ring and mock ring with second shuttle, that is both with the same thread (colour).
I usually tat the inner ring from the backside, and the chain (the mock ring) from the front side.

2.1 Inner true ring with core thread (first shuttle), mock ring with ball thread (or second shuttle)

Reference: 
I tatted the inner ring (pic 16) with my first shuttle (currently the red - core thread’s shuttle). I tatted reversed stitches because that is the backside for me (but this is optional).

In pic 17, I reversed work to tat the outer chain. The ball (yellow) thread has been moved on the back, that is to comply with the direction of the thread that is coming from last second half stitch (but, if my last chain had the first half stitch visible on the front side, then I would had moved the thread on the front)

Notice that when I'm going to start the mock ring, I pull the first shuttle thread, and the inner ring tips over.

In pic 18 I’m joining rings. Of course, the “onion ring join” and the JSS (“Join to smooth side”) can be used, but here I chose to use a lock join, because actually the "mock ring" is a chain and it is not mandatory that the core thread has to slide, unlike in a true ring. Remember to snug well the chain before the lock join, otherwise the two sides will look different. The lock join is very useful when the pattern doesn’t require a regular picot in that point, in fact there will be always a “structural” very tiny picot that can be used afterward as a close joint.

There are many possible alternatives for the join, for example the “Catherine Wheel join - CWJ”, that it is done with the second shuttle thread (it’s a variation of the “Dora Young knot” used to join a chain to a picot below with the first shuttle thread).

The CWJ join makes a smoother chain than the lock join (similar to what you get with the onion ring join or with the JSS). You can also follow a tip by Robin Perfetti, she uses two CWJ to obtain a balanced outer ring, in this post: “Using CWJ for outer chain of Onion Ring” http://tattingbythebay.blogspot.in/2015/06/frauberger-edging-pattern-notes.html

As you can see in my picture, I counted the CWJ as one ds, then I tatted 5ds, joined to previous element, 4ds, then the CWJ, picot, another CWJ, then 4 ds. picot, 5ds.
You can find a video with three possible alternatives for the join (“lock join”, “S&R join” e “CWJ”) by Karen Cabrera:

Any type of join you choose, I fully agree with Muskaan (https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2016/03/demystifying-joins.html):

“Principle : Any, & I stress, entire project can be completed with just TWO joins – the picot join & the lock join, preferably working with two shuttles for a free-sliding core thread throughout. All other joins are a modification of these basic joins for the purpose of beauty and perfection; smoothly curved chains; even-looking and complete stitches; avoiding colour blips in 2-coloured tatting; ease of switching colours; etc."

⇒⇒⇒ Closing the mock ring (and colours choices):⇐⇐⇐
 
If I don’t want to switch shuttles (colours) (that is: mock ring and next chain  the same colour), like in pic 20 & 21, I make the “onion ring join” (that is like the “S&RJ – slope & roll join”), a normal join taking a loop from the ball thread and passing the core shuttle into it, without tensioning the ball thread: in this way the core thread still slides and both thread are already in the right position to start the next chain (in yellow in pic 21).
If I want to switch shuttles (colours) (that is: mock ring and next chain will be different colour), I have many options:
  • (like in pic 22 & 23) a “lock join” with first shuttle (core shuttle).
  • Pull a loop of ball thread as if making a normal join, and passing the core shuttle into it, but tensioning the ball thread, to let the loop of core thread to pop back, this tends to switch shuttles (colours) automatically. That isn’t a new type of lock join, I’ve used it many times and I think it is some sort of vintage lock join, but I don’t have a “name” for it, I've had a suggestion to call it "block join". You can see it in the lower part of my drawing in Flickr: https://flic.kr/p/bvs5GV
  • a “reverse join”, as it is showed by Muskaan here: https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2017/03/revisiting-options.html ( Elaine P. Gan “reverse join” is described here:  https://www.craftree.com/forum/threadfs/35396 )
With these types of lock joins, both thread are already in the right position to start the next chain with switched shuttles (chain in red in pic 24).

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The technique with one inner true ring and outer chains (mock rings) also permits to tat different patterns, not only onion rings, for example some vintage patterns like this one that I glued on a bookmark:
I tatted that short sample some time ago, pattern is called “tulipani” (tulips) and I found it in an Italian booklet, "Selezione Tricot - Il Chiacchierino", 1990.

The "outermost mock rings" method described here, has two more variants, that one with shuttles (colours) switched and another with ring and mock ring the same colour.

If you liked my posts till now, I'd like having your opinion and if you are aware of more methods, please tell me.

... To be continued!

Ciao,
Ninetta

Tuesday, 21 April 2020

variations on the onion recipe

This post is part of a series.
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Continue from: 1. Onion rings with true rings

1.1 Variation: how to join the inner ring

To join outer to inner ring, we use the so called “onion ring join”, that let the core thread sliding.
Another join with the same characteristic is the “Join to smooth side” (JSS) also known as the “Anne Dyer's join” (because it is in the only one book by Anne Dyer). I like very much this join and I often use it in my tatting.
For the JSS, there is a video by Karen Cabrera: https://youtu.be/rN-wsHQQ6Dc
In pic 11 there are two onion rings, on the left there is the one with the onion ring join, on the right the other with the JSS.

1.2 Variation: tatting the outer ring

For the outer ring, Aurora Lozada shares her “perfect method” here: https://tathelper.blogspot.com/2014/05/my-perfect-onion-ring.html#more
She suggests tatting the first ds of the outer ring and then moving the inner ring down, so that it will be trapped into the outer ring's loop.
Her tutorial has been shared as a pdf, too, in Georgia Seitz’s site: http://www.georgiaseitz.com/2014/auroralozadamethodonionring.pdf
(Aurora, in the same tutorial, also explains her method to tat “Split Onion Rings”)

In my case, I chose to add that first ds to the total stitches’ count (that is I tatted 1ds, then moved the inner ring, then continued with 5ds, and so on).
Kathleen Minniti shared a slight variation, that is she captures the inner ring in the first half stitch (within the loop after flipping the stitch) and proceeds with the 2nd half stitch. (I like this variation and I think I will use it. If I remember to!)
I didn’t take pictures for this variant, but you find the reference and pictures by Muskaan here: https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2019/12/concentricity-pattern.html
=> UPDATE: This is the step-by-step tutorial by Muskaan for the Captured Onion Ring, Kathleen Minniti's method:
https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2020/05/captured-onion-rings.html

1.3 Variation: tatting the outer ring first

The outer ring can be tatted first. That is explained by Anastasija P. Yelisejeva in her site.
She shares a tutorial ( in pdf format) that shows us how to proceed and the two methods (A and B in my picture here below) that she uses to join the inner ring (tatted after that the outer ring is closed).

I've added the extra picot in the middle (that it isn't in her tutorial), but that depends on my pattern.
You can find her tutorial here: http://frivolitatting.com/?page_id=813&lang=en (in that page, look for the “onion ring and mock onion ring”.) (direct link:  http://frivolitatting.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/OR_ENG_2.11.12.pdf)

1.4 Variation: tatting the onion ring from the back side

You may have noted that I’ve tatted all variations working from the front side.

But Marilee Rockley shared her method to tat the whole onion ring from the backside. As she writes (and I agree), it can happen to find a pattern that you’d like tatting frontside/backside, and that tutorial will be useful then.

I haven’t tatted this variant, then no pictures.
You can find her photo-tutorial here: https://yarnplayertats.blogspot.com/2016/03/tatting-onion-ring-from-back-side.html

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The "true rings" method is just one way to tat onion rings. If you liked my posts till now, I'd like having your opinion and if you are aware of more methods (with true rings).

But then, you can tat one inner true ring and the outer like mock ring; or tat all mock rings... but for these you'd wait for my next post.

... To be continued!

Ciao,
Ninetta

Tuesday, 14 April 2020

the onion dilemma

Every time I run into a pattern with onion rings, I feel as I'd start from my beginnings, with a dilemma, wondering which method I should use to tat it: concentric rings? mock rings? in which order? I need - every time - a little brush-up.
What happens then, it is that now I have a lot of notes that I'll try to share here, in a series of posts. I hope that you'll appreciate my effort and you won't be too strict if my English or my tatting have some flaws. Please leave me any comment, I will love it. 

 

Onion Rings - Part I


I will use a simple pattern, and with those arrows I'm trying to indicate the front side  of the work, that doesn't always mean that it is the working direction.

The dotted arrows indicate the joining point between the two rings and one picot that you will see in my pics but it is not mandatory for tatting onion rings.

I tatted with two coloured threads, to better show the steps and to make it clear when I switched shuttle.

All methods can be worked with one colour only, with 2 shuttles CTM. Everything remains valid, except - of course - that if you switched shuttles, it won't be evident in the finished piece. But, knowing more than one method, it can be handy in case you need to plan thread's length, so you can, for example, choose to switch shuttles or change method when in shortage of thread.

When I worked from the back side (for example those chains that are between onion rings), I worked stitches in reverse order (that is first the second half and then the first half), but this is just my personal choice and you can ignore it.

°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°
Many thanks to Muskaan for everything she shares in her blog  (https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com). 
In fact, I found many of the online resources and tips that are listed here, thanks to her previous posts.
°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°

In the next:
First shuttle = core shuttle (warning: when I switch shuttles, core thread will be a different color!)
Second shuttle = "ball" shuttle.

For the sake of simplicity, I started with one ring (5ds,picot,5ds) and one chain (3ds, 3 picots separated by 3ds, 3ds).
At this point, the core shuttle is that one with the red thread.

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Introduction:

Onion rings are concentric rings, two or more, that can be tatted with:
  1. all true rings
  2. one inner true ring and outer (one or more) mock rings
  3. all mock rings
These rings may be joined with one picot (like in the pattern here, but it is not mandatory), this join can be:
  • a join that let the core thread sliding
  • a lock join (but not for true rings)
The way these rings are closed at their base depends on:
  • the type of rings (true ring or mock ring)
  • the thread (color) that we want tatting with next.

Whatever is the method, a SLT (Shoe Lace Trick) can be done at any moment, to change the position of shuttles and then the threads (colors).

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1. Onion rings with true rings

You can find this method explained in:
The join used to join outer to inner ring is called “onion ring join”, it is similar to the S&RJ – slope & roll join -, but there can be different names for similar techniques, depending on where they're used. The original link for a drawing by Debbie Arnold that explains the S&RJ is here: https://www.ds9designs.com/patterns_free/Joins.pdf

This method is showed in pictures from 1 to 5.
With the first shuttle, make the loop around the hand and work the inner ring from the front side.

Then:
(fig. 1 e 2) For the second ring (tatted from the front side too), take the loop around the hand, passing the thread in front of the inner ring, around the hand and then again in front of the inner ring. Take care that the inner ring should not be reversed.

(fig.3) The "onion ring join" is quite a normal join except that the picot to be joined is under the current core thread (that is: take a loop of the thread around the hand and pass it through the picot, then pass the core shuttle through that loop). Then, be careful, you must not pull the thread around the hand, in this way the core thread is still free to slide.

(fig.4) Leave the space for one picot and continue with the pattern. This picot is optional, it depends on the pattern.
In (fig.5) there's the onion ring finished.

~●~●~●~●~●~●~●~●~●~●~
The "true rings" method can vary slightly, depending how you tat the outer ring, which join you choose to attach rings together, or if you tat the inner ring after the outer ring, or if you need to tat the onion ring from the back side. But these are for the next post in the series.

... To be continued!

Ciao,
Ninetta

Update:
This post is part of a series.

Thank you very much for all your nice comments.

Ciao
Ninetta