Translate

====================

====================
Dear Reader,
I share here what I like and what works for me. If you've been following me, you know that I can change my mind from time to time, and feel free to comment that I'm completely wrong, you may be right. I'm not running a business. I'm not paid and have never received any compensation or facilitation for any review/brand/site here mentioned. In case one day we'll ever meet, I'll be the one offering you a cup of Italian coffee, too.
====================

Tuesday, 4 August 2020

locked in the old corner

I found this interesting pattern in an old book, here: http://www.georgiaseitz.com/public/emmyliebert/liebertbk1reprint.pdf

The original book is Emmy Liebert Book 1, from 1916, then the online book is a Dutch version.
The same pattern has been published many times in various books.


It looks like a rounded motif that has trefoils attached in a second moment. But that's not true.
Corners are tatted in the last round, with the second shuttle (ball thread) that is: leave a bare thread space, then tat the trefoil. Just like floating rings.
Then, when I came back to the round, to give the twisted effect, I joined two times the thread, with lock joins. I don't read Dutch, so that is my solution, just looking at the picture and guessing.

I started with two shuttles CTM, and then climbed up with a split ring. If I tat it again, for something like an earring, for example, I would tat it cutting the thread between rounds. But I've had a chat with Dr. Downplay and he said that my sample is pretty good as it is!

It's been a nice challenge and, as always, old patterns teach us a lot. Ready in a couple of hours!
Ciao,
Ninetta.

Tuesday, 28 July 2020

no mirror, no tiling

Celtic earrings with treble tatting stitches.
What does the title mean? You're right, I should know...
 
Browsing the web - trying to find any instructive site about celtic knots - I've found that Wikipedia has an entry and that at the end of the page there are some very interesting links.

One of those, it is an online celtic knot generator: http://obyx.org/knots.obyx

I filled the form with parameters: (3,2,0,0,no mirror, no tiling), and every time you click the "regenerate" button, you get few different drawings. I chose two of them and tried to transpose to tatting.



Thread is 4 strands Sanbest metallic thread, color numbers 17 and 1565.
If you like them, I can share the pattern. It is true celtic, because I started from celtic drawings, but they can be easily tatted with one shuttle and the ball, the weaving part being only at the end.

It's been very hard sewing ends, it seems that my eyesight is getting worse... I used the camera as it was a magnifying glass! It works wonderfully!
Ciao,
Ninetta
UPDATE: Please refer to the page "Treble Tatting Stitch - Summary" - https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/p/blog-page_95.html for any info about treble tatting stitches, thank you.

Tuesday, 21 July 2020

learning the celtic knot

I made that earrings up for the Italian Facebook group, in which we are tatting together and learning what celtic tatting is.
It's not very original, it just helped me to understand the celtic knot. 

Some links where I found instructions:

- a video by Karen Cabrera, Frivolite tatting lesson 82 Nudo celta celtic knot: https://youtu.be/FAAEnw50YbLQ 

- the pattern at the end of Karen's video is by Heather Cook, I found it here, with her instruction - even it is different, it's a knot with two chains - (I thank her also for the tips for drawing):  http://www.tattedtreasures.com/2011/11/easy-celtic-motif-pattern/

- Ruth Perry (aka Rozella Linden) wrote many books with celtic patterns (that I don't  have) and she has a blog and a site where she shares some of her patterns for free: https://rozellalinden.net/free/
http://rozellalinden.blogspot.com/

- Wally Sosa wrote one book that is still available for purchase, I bought it some years ago: https://www.etsy.com/listing/34199697/book-celtic-tatting-with-a-twist

➿➿➿➿➿➿➿
After the celtic knot, that I closed with a lock join to the starting picot, I didn't cut the thread. 
I tatted a ring 8-8ds, leaving a very small bare thread space, then I curled and blocked it in position (with a normal join), over the lock join, moving both threads up to continue.
To insert the earrings' post, I used the same method and stitch count that I used for the earrings in the "Parure Anne", that I explained here: https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/2020/06/parure-anne-with-pattern.html#Anneorrearringspattern

Actually the celtic knot is just a knot and it needs a rope to be knotted! Then, I tatted a long chain of 120 ds.

Starting a 'dead end chain' may be done in few different ways, there's a blog post by Muskaan with links and pics: 

Here I choose the method suggested by Sue Hanson, making a mock picot and second half ds unflipped and using a short loop of thread in place of the paper clip, that is because I used the starting point of the chain to weave the celtic knot.

The difficult here is to keep an even tension through the chain. It needs a little exercise. I suggest to push the stitches as you go and pay attention to don't let behind unwanted small picots.

I prepared a drawing that helped me to make the knot and my first attempt was with a shoelace. Starting from the asterisk, I pinned the last ds of the chain and followed carefully my line, passing over and under. Then I joined the two ends with a lock join.

Hope to see your tatted celtic knot soon! Join us on Facebook!

🚀🚀🚀🚀🚀
Woo-hoo! This is my 500th post!!! Thank you everyone for your kind support 🙏 ❤!

Ciao, 
Ninetta 

Tuesday, 14 July 2020

weave

I often go to the WordReference.com because you already know, my poor English vocabulary don't let me free to write whatever I want, but just what I can, doing my best (let alone the pronuntiation, that is terrible!). So... I found two meanings for the verb to weave, one is to make something by interlacing and the second is to make a fabric by weaving (in Italian we have two different words). I thought it would have been a nice title for this post.

Thread is cotton size 80, the multicolored is Lizbeth, the green was already on the shuttle and I can't remember the brand.

Sue Hanson shared with the group her early Celtic work on her old Web Page:
She wrote that the pattern for her 6 pointed Celtic design was published in the Lace Guild’s magazine (UK) #93 in January 1999. She's a pioneer in modern tatting.

The appearance of two celtic motifs in a line in my blog, it is due to a Facebook event, in the Italian group, in which we are tatting together and learning what celtic tatting is. I'm very happy that many tatters tried it. That's a wonderful way to weave together tatters! 😍

Actually it is the only tatted piece I can show you today, in fact I am on finishing the net that I started in October. I'm halfway, I hope to finish it for the end of this month. I'm embroidering or I'm weaving? As per my own literal translation, because I pass the thread through holes under and over, well, I weave!


Ciao,
Ninetta 

Tuesday, 7 July 2020

Lorella

Pattern is by Lorella Fanotti, you can find her in Facebook 

UPDATE: she posted the pattern with instructions for the needle, in her blog here:  http://macchecrochet.blogspot.com/2020/03/blog-post.html


Thread is Sanbest metallic, colour numbers 88-51 and 108.

She needle tats, while I used 4 shuttles and it was quite a puzzle!

Ciao, 
Ninetta

Tuesday, 30 June 2020

We call them nuts

I had a crazy idea in mind and started a little motif with my usual size 80 thread, but soon I realised that I'd had to switch to a bigger size! You know that I love tiny threads but those little nuts are quite indistinguishable from other elements, if you don't have a magnifying glass! They are those little bumps in the last round of the wheel  in the background in next picture.

I googled for the English name of that pile of stitches that are done in crochet, and I found that what in Italian we call "nocciolina", that is little nut (it doesn't mean the peanut in this case), it is known in English as popcorn stitch. After the title, if you were thinking of another kind of "nuts" in this blog, maybe you can be right too! 😂
So, my name for that is "tatting nuts" because I like nuts more than popcorn!

The tatted nut starts with a normal sized picot, in next pic I compared it with a treble tatting stitch that needs a very small picot (or a bare thread) to start with.
I used Cebelia DMC size 10 thread, so with this size I suggest that the very small picot would be the 1/8"  and the normal sized the 1/4" step.

Then, the tatted nut is:
- 1 treble tatting stitch (abbr. tds), followed by
- 3 second half of the treble tatting stitch

The second half of the tds starts just after the first treble tatting stitch, that is: 
Laying the picot across the ball thread, pull up a loop of thread through the same picot used to tat the first tds.
Then, take another loop of the ball thread and pull it through the previous loop.
Now slip the shuttle through the loop thus formed. Don't tighten it, yet.
Hold a loop of the core thread in the ring finger, then pass the shuttle from back to front, in space between core thread and loop, 3 times.
Tighten the ball thread and don't let the core thread slip out of place.
Then, pull the core thread.
Repeat the second half of the tds for 3 times, then, do not leave any space and tat at least one double stitch after the nut to let it pile up:
I like that new element and it can give more possibilities to create new designs 😉👍

💝💝💝💝💝
Sometimes I feel that the treble tatting stitch hasn't been well accepted by all tatters yet, but there are little episodes that make my day, for example the other day one of my aunts (that really dislike tatting because it is simple - in her own words - and highly repetitive) has looked with admiration one of my edging featuring tds. 
Another great support for me is one comment I had some time ago, that I copy here again.

craftie sylvie left that comment on my post "tatting movements and stitches":

"I believe that knitting and crochet have remained so popular because they have kept evolving and re-inventing themselves. I first heard about tatting about 13 years ago; I worked on and off for several years, and became more serious about it some 4 years ago. I think the reason for that renewed interest in me was the fact that there are many techniques still unknown to me, and the idea that creative tatters keep on inventing others. I just LOVE learning new techniques! Knitting is just two sticks around which we wrap yarn, crochet is just a hook around which we wrap yarn, but I've been a knitter and a crocheter for 45 years and I'm still passionate about knitting and crochet because there are still new "things" to do. PLEASE, just go on creating. I believe creative designers are the reason why tatting is not lost, and I'm very grateful for that 😀💚💜 "

Thank you very much, Sylvie, re-reading your words I don't feel I'm a nut anymore 💕 😘!!!

Please refer to the page "Treble Tatting Stitch - Summary" - https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/p/blog-page_95.html for any info about treble tatting stitches, thank you.

Ciao,
Ninetta 

Tuesday, 23 June 2020

m'ama non m'ama - beaded daisy chain

Daisies symbolize new beginnings! Enjoy the Summer! 🌼🌼🌼🌼🌼
"M'ama non m'ama" in Italian means "he loves me, he loves me not" and it's the famous Valentine's Day game (read about it here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/He_loves_me..._he_loves_me_not).
Who didn't pluck petals while saying that?

For my "m'ama non m'ama bracelets, I've used Sanbest metallic threads, seed beads are rocailles and miyuki delica 15/0. For the centre of the daisies, I've used Gutermann rocailles 9/0, Swarovski bicone beads and pearls 4mm.

The pattern works well with any thread of your choice.For this tutorial, I’ve used DMC Cebelia n.10. 

LEGEND
ds : double tatting stitch
SR : Split Ring

Wound 2 shuttles CTM, loading many seed beads in both shuttles (for petals).

Start the very first ring with 12 ds, with or without beads.

If you start the very first ring with 1 bead in the loop around the hand, then close the ring and the bead will be trapped at the base, between the first ds and the last ds. (see next collage, pic A)

If you start the very first ring without beads, you need to tat the second, that is a split ring, with one bead in the loop around the hand, so then when you close the split ring the bead will be trapped at the base, between the first ds and the last ds. But that will be clearer at the end of this post.

All subsequent tatted elements are split rings.
Bracelets have two elements: "the beaded diamond" and "the beaded daisy", tatted alternatively, in the sequence you like.

The beaded diamond:
SR:
- Move one bead from the first shuttle near the previous ring (pic B)
- Start the split ring with the first shuttle, with 2 beads in the loop (pic B)
- Tat 6ds. (In some bracelets I tatted SR with 8ds/8ds, but everything is still valid).
- Move one bead from the second shuttle near the previous ring (pic C).
- Move one bead in the loop near the very first ds (pic C).
- With the second shuttle, tat 6ds on the second half of the split ring (pic D)
Now, if you close the ring, the last bead in the loop will be trapped at the base (pic E)
(I designed a similar pattern in 2013 and shared a video in a tatting group in Facebook. Since then, sadly that group has been deleted.)

The beaded daisy (two SRs are required to see one daisy emerging):
FIRST SR: (see below, pic 1)
1. Start the split ring with the first shuttle, with 2 beads in the loop.
2. Tat 8ds. (In some bracelets I tatted SR with 6ds/6ds, but everything is still valid).
3. Move one bead in the loop near the very first ds.
4. With the second shuttle, tat 8ds on the second half of the split ring.

Here it is where the beaded daisy start:
5. Pick one loose bead in contrasting colour, for the centre of the daisy, and pass the crochet hook through the bead, then take the loop's thread back through the bead the opposite direction till it is big enough to pass your shuttle through it (see below, picture 2).
6. Move enough beads (3 in my example) from the first shuttle near the last tatted ds (pic 3). (**)
7. Pass the first shuttle through the loop just formed in step 5. (pic 3)
8. Slide the centre bead onto the loop, toward the first shuttle's thread, and push it till the loop around the hand is completely free again (pic 4)
9. Now, close the SR and the last bead in the loop will be trapped at the base. (pic 5)
10. Pull the first shuttle to "close" the first half side of the daisy (pic 6).
(Note that the thread loop inside the SR is blocked between the orange bead and the first side of the SR.)
SECOND SR: 
11. Start the split ring with the first shuttle, with 2 beads in the loop (pic 7)
12. Before starting the very first ds, join the thread: that is pull a loop of the thread around the hand through the very small space between the seed beads and the centre bead, pass the shuttle through it and tension (pic 8).
13. Tat 8ds. (In some bracelets I tatted SR with 6ds/6ds, but everything is still valid).
14. Move enough beads (3 in my example) from the second shuttle near the previous ring (see it on the left of pic 1 and also the next picture below, with the Swarovski bicone). (**)
15. Move one bead in the loop near the very first ds.
16. With the second shuttle, tat 8ds on the second half of the split ring (pic 1)

Now, if you close the split ring, the last bead in the loop will be trapped at the base (like in pic E) and the next element will be a beaded diamond. 
If you don't close the split ring, you can start another beaded daisy, restarting from FIRST SR, step 5 (like in pic 2).

(**)For the centre of the daisy with Gutermann rocailles 9/0, I've moved 3 beads in step 6 and 14.
With Swarovski bicone beads and pearls 4mm, I've moved 5 beads in step 6 and 14.

Don't forget step 12!!!
Ciao,
Ninetta

Tuesday, 16 June 2020

pattern for the tiffany bezel

That is the pattern for tatting around a rivoli 14mm with a thread size 20, the same that I showed in previous post:
https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/2020/06/tiffany-bezel.html

I've used Sanbest metallic 4 strands, colour number 121, a rivoli Swarovski Peridot 14mm, and 8 miyuki delica seed beads 15/0.

(In theory, with slight modifications, the pattern could be adapted to different size for rivoli and thread.)

LEGEND
ds : double tatting stitch
tds : treble tatting stitch
b : bead 
vsp : very small picot
R : ring
SR : Split Ring
vsp : very small picot

Wound 2 shuttles CTM, loading 8 beads in the core shuttle.

Start a ring:
Notice that this ring starts directly with treble tatting stitches:
https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/2019/02/jumping-in-place-starting-without-very.html

R (put 1b in the loop): 3tds,b,3tds,b,3tds,b,3tds,b,3tds,b,3tds,b,3tds,b,2tds,vsp,1ds.

Close the ring and climb out in this way:
- Take a loop of the core shuttle's thread, through the last very small picot.
- Then, take another loop of the core thread and pull it through the previous loop. 
- Slip the other shuttle through the loop thus formed. 
- Pull the core shuttle tight. 
Then, there's the back side, that is all rings:
SR: 6ds / 6ds
R: 6ds, join to the next hidden picot (same place of each bead underneath), 6ds.
Repeat R for 6 times.
- Insert the rivoli -
Finish with a split ring:
SR: 6ds (join to the last hidden picot) / 6ds.

To insert the earrings' post, I used the same method that I used for the earrings in the "Parure Anne", that I explained here: https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/2020/06/parure-anne-with-pattern.html#Anneorrearringspattern
That is:
SR (name it A): 8ds-8ds
SR (name it B): 8ds-8ds
Multiple onion ring:
innermost ring: 6ds-6ds.
second inner ring: 8ds, onion ring join, picot, 8ds.
outer/third SPLIT ring: 12ds, onion ring join, picot, 12ds.
Finish with a small ring of 8 double stitches (I ended with the SSSR method by Miranda).

Assembling:
Insert the small ring, from front to back inside the SR named A, then pick up the post and put it between the multiple onion ring and the SR named B, then inside the small ring.
I finished it sewing small ring and SR B together with a needle, using 2 strands of my thread.

Ciao,
Ninetta
UPDATE: Please refer to the page "Treble Tatting Stitch - Summary" - https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/p/blog-page_95.html for any info about treble tatting stitches, thank you.

Tuesday, 9 June 2020

tiffany bezel

That's a nice way to tat around a rivoli. I learned that the "Tiffany setting" is the most famous engagement ring, since 1886. That one with the diamond, of course.

In my tatted version with the much cheaper rivoli, I have two rounds: front side there is a ring with only treble tatting stitches and the second round has rings on the back of the rivoli.

I didn't cut the thread for the entire length of the bracelet:
Thread is Sanbest metallic 4 strands, colour number 108. I used rivoli Swarovski 14mm.

I'm still playing with this method, I will share it as soon as I'm more confident that it works well.

In the next pendant I put the bezel in the centre and then I tatted 3 repetitions of the square pattern "oh, sugar sugar!" (visual pattern is in Flickr: https://flic.kr/p/HRYJaF)
Thread for that necklace is Sanbest 3 strands, colour is called Chameleon, a multicolored green and gold, mixed metallic and polyester. The rivoli is a beautiful "Crystal Sunshine DeLite" 14mm. Little beads are miyuki rocailles 15/0, copper.

Ciao,
Ninetta
UPDATE: Please refer to the page "Treble Tatting Stitch - Summary" - https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/p/blog-page_95.html for any info about treble tatting stitches, thank you.

Tuesday, 2 June 2020

Parure “Anne” - with pattern

I’ve been updating my tutorials' and patterns’ pages, with links and pictures. Please if you find any oversight from my side, leave a comment in the corresponding blog post. Thank you very much for your help.
🌸🌸🌸🌸🌸🌸🌸🌸🌸

For tatting the bracelet, I’ve followed almost Anne Orr's pattern for an edging. It is from J&P Coats Crochet, Cross Stitch & Tatting Book #14, 1923. (Tatting is at pages 7 and 8.)
The edging is the fourth starting from the top, at page 7:
https://www.georgiaseitz.com/public/anneorr/book14/ao_p_7.jpg
To have the inner ring coloured (blue in my sample), split rings are tatted with 3 shuttles, two of them are for the split rings, the third shuttle/thread is hidden inside the reverse side of the SR, and it is used to tat the inner ring.
I tatted my bracelet with only 2 shuttles, the inner ring is tatted and joined to the outer ring using the same method that I explained here: Anne Orr's Slip Join (AOSJ) – pics 43 & 44
 
In the next, numbers without other indications are double stitch count.
ds = double stitch
- = picot
+ = normal up join
R = ring
SR = split ring
OR = onion ring
AOSJ = Anne Orr's Slip Join
SSSR = single shuttle split ring

Anne Orr’s pattern for edging with split onion rings:
SR: 8-1- (stop and then tat 1-8 ds after the reversed side) / 9 [R:10 AOSJ 10] 9.
Repeat for the desired length.

My bracelet’s pattern:
Bicones and pearls are 4mm. Thread is Sanbest col.num. 108 (4 strands, very similar to a size 20 cotton thread). I put the beads using this method: Bead in face-inward picot https://flic.kr/p/mTMZeB
Start with a ring: 12.
SR: 9- (stop and then tat 9 ds after the reversed side) / 9, [inner R:4, insert bead, 4, AOSJ 4, join the picot for bead, 4 ], 9.
Repeat split rings for the desired length.
Finish with a ring: 12.

I usually use this method to finish the last ring of my bracelets: Finishing with SSSR (http://tattingfool.blogspot.com/2011/07/finishing-with-sssr.html)

**************************************
The pendant’s pattern starts with an onion ring with true rings (https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/2020/04/the-onion-dilemma.html):

Onion ring:
- Inner ring: R:4, insert bicone, 4, AOSJ 4, join the picot for bicone, 4.
- Outer ring: 6-6-6 onion ring join 6-6-6

Then I climbed to the second round in the same way I used for the "square medallion in leaf design", described here: https://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/2020/05/mock-and-split-but-still-genuine.html.
Rings’ stitch count in the second round is the same as the central true onion rings, but they are all split onion rings, like in the bracelet and in the Anne Orr’s "square medallion in leaf design".
(Note for myself: this second round needs a drawing)

Then I climbed to a third round (the first bigger ring is a split ring):
SR: 6-6; Repeat for 3 times.
SR: 6 / 3, [bigger ring: 6, insert pearl, 2+8+2, join the picot for pearl, 6], 3. (bigger ring is joined twice to the second round)
Repeat all around,
then finish with a round of Chains: 8, lock join to split rings’ base.

The pendant ends with a split chain and a multiple onion ring, that is 3 true onion rings and one mock ring (“6.2.2 Inner and median true rings and outer mock ring”, it is for 3 rings but it is the same method with 4 concentric rings).

I “copied” the idea from Muskaan, who used a folded multiple onion ring to have a loop/hook where passing the chain through (Thank you Muskaan!). This is the link to her original post: https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2015/04/parallel-tracks.html

Curled onion ring:
innermost ring: 6-6.
second inner ring: 8 onion ring join, picot, 8.
third inner ring: 12 onion ring join, picot, 12.
outer mock ring: 14 onion ring join, picot, 14.
Fold it over and tie threads.

The necklace is a line of split rings, all are 8-8.

**************************************
Earrings’ pattern:
The earrings’s onion rings are tatted with the same stitch count of the bracelet.
It starts with an onion ring:
Inner ring: R:4, insert pearl, 4, AOSJ 4, join the picot for pearl, 4.
Outer ring: 18 onion ring join 18.
SR: 9- (stop and then tat 9 ds after the reversed side) / 9, [inner R:4, insert bead, 4, AOSJ 4, join the picot for bead, 4 ], 9.
SR (name it A): 8-8
SR (name it B): 8-8
Multiple onion ring:
innermost ring: 6-6.
second inner ring: 8 onion ring join, picot, 8.
outer/third SPLIT ring: 12 onion ring join, picot, 12.
Finish with a small ring of 8 double stitches (I ended with the SSSR method by Miranda).

Then, to insert the earrings’ post, please look at next pictures: insert the small ring, from front to back inside the SR named A, then pick up the post and put it between the multiple onion ring and the SR named B, then inside the small ring.
I finished it sewing small ring and SR B together with a needle, using 2 strands of my thread.

That is a close up of the earrings, front and back:


Ciao,
Ninetta

Tuesday, 26 May 2020

whichever way you choose

This post is part of a series.
In this last part, you’ll find two chapters:
-->The 6th chapter is about which way you tat outer rings. How the final onion ring looks if we tat clockwise, compared to the other way? When it is convenient a change of direction?
-->The 7th chapter is about elements of design. That is, for example, can the inner ring be block tatting and can we still call it onion ring? I learned that the central inner ring can be substituted with other elements, since I found tatters who tats Cluny Onion Ring.

6. Direction of tatting

Note: words “clockwise” and “counterclockwise” are referring to the direction of tatting, if you look at it from the front side.

All methods in previous Parts have the outermost rings that run clockwise. For example, in chapter 2, the outer ring is a chain tatted from the front side of the work, in clockwise direction, that is the the working direction.

6.1 Outer ring in counterclockwise direction (Alligator Join)

I messaged with Sue Hanson before starting this series, about the old German method by Tina Frauberger (see Part III parag. 2.1) and how Georgia Seitz and their tatting friends started calling those concentric rings in the way we call them nowadays: onions probably became tatted onions from 2001 on... Then, Sue shared with me her way to close the outer mock ring, using the Alligator join.

The Alligator join is also called Under and Over Join.

That is not a new method, it is just another way to close a chain over itself. In Elgiva Nicholls’s “Tatting – History and techniques” there’s a paragraph where this method is described, and it’s entitled “The running scroll”.

For a tutorial about the Under and Over Join, please read this one by Muskaan:
https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2018/05/mock-rings-1-under-and-over-join.html

Jane Eborall shares her drawing here: http://www.janeeborall.freeservers.com/AJoin.pdf

There's a reason to prefer the Alligator Join in onion mock rings and it depends if the onion ring is free in your current pattern; it should not have to be joined to a previous element.
It isn’t a constraint: in case you really like this method, and you want to use it in any pattern, Muskaan comes to rescue you: in the same tutorial linked above, she shows us how to manoeuvre if the ring needs to be attached to a previous element.

Compare this method with:
2.1 Inner true ring with core thread (first shuttle), mock ring with ball thread (or second shuttle)
in  Part III


In next picture:
First shuttle = core shuttle (yellow thread)
Second shuttle = "ball" shuttle (red thread).

Differences with the method described in Part III:
  • The inner ring is tatted from the frontside with first shuttle (currently the yellow - core thread’s shuttle). The inner ring won’t tip over. 
  • The outer chain is tatted normally, as though it was a continuation of a basic pattern – a line of rings and chains. To join the inner ring, I did a lock join (optional).
  • The outer chain turns around and over the inner ring, to comply with the direction of the mock ring that is emerging counterclockwise – if you look at it from frontside.
I tatted the chain from backside with reverse order stitches; but in the picture you see the frontside of the work.
Planning the direction is important when we follow visual patterns: if you use this method, you should pay attention and start the double stitches' count from the right side of the drawn outermost ring.

⇒⇒⇒ Closing the outer ring with the Alligator join:⇐⇐⇐
To close the mock ring, (working from the back side) put the shuttle thread above and ball thread under the base of inner ring (if you exchange threads, the yellow/core thread would be visible from front side).  That is, the Alligator Join.

Then, tension both threads and continue tatting the next chain as per your pattern. 

6.2 Onions with three concentric rings

In the next pictures:
First shuttle = core shuttle (red thread)
Second shuttle = "ball" shuttle (yellow thread).

Pattern (ds= double stitch):
Inner ring: 5ds, picot, 5ds.
Median ring: 5ds, picot, 5ds, join to inner ring, 5ds, picot, 5ds.
Outer ring: 7ds, join to median ring, picot, 7ds, join to median ring, picot, 7ds, join to median ring, picot, 7ds.

We have many choices, and in the next there’s only a subset. I leave it to you to discover other possibilities.

6.2.1) Three true rings (like in Part I and II):
Everything in Part I and in Part II is still valid. In next pic you see only one example.

6.2.2) Inner and median true rings and outer mock ring (like in Part III):
In this case, treat inner and median rings like only one ring. Everything in Part III is still valid for the outermost mock ring.
(Hint for more options: alternatively, you can use the method “counterclockwise” described in previous paragraph 6.1.)

In next pic you see only one example (please refer to pictures from 16 to 19 in Part III).
For the JSS, please see pictures from 6 to 9 in Part II.
 
6.2.3)  Inner ring as a true ring and both median and outer rings as mock rings: method A
In this case, the inner ring is tatted from the frontside with first shuttle (currently the red - core thread’s shuttle).
The median chain is tatted as though it was a continuation of a line of rings and chains. I tatted the chain from backside with reverse order stitches; but in next pic you see the frontside of the work.
Till this point, it is equal to the method described in previous paragraph 6.1.
Then, to close the median mock ring, lock join to the base. That switches threads so that the yellow thread is the core thread for the outer mock rings.

The outer mock ring is tatted from the frontside, here I closed it at its base with a lock join.

6.2.4)  Inner ring as a true ring and both median and outer rings as mock rings: method B
In this case, I tatted the inner ring with my first shuttle (currently the red - core thread’s shuttle). I tatted reversed stitches because that is the backside for me (but this is optional).

Then, the ball (yellow) thread has been moved on the back, that is to comply with the direction of the thread that is coming from last second half stitch (but, if my last chain had the first half stitch visible on the front side, then I would had moved the thread on the front). Notice that when I'm going to start the mock ring, I pull the first shuttle thread, and the inner ring tips over.

I tatted the median chain from the frontside, clockwise direction. Till this point, it is equal to the method “2.1 Inner true ring with core thread (first shuttle), mock ring with ball thread (or second shuttle)”, (please refer to pictures from 16 to 19 in Part III).
Then, to close the median mock ring, here I chose to do the Alligator Join, that is put the shuttle thread under and ball thread over the base of inner ring. The Alligator Join let me continue with the next outer ring in a smooth way.
Outer ring: tension well and start the outer mock ring. I chose to close the outer mock ring at its base with an onion ring join.

&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

In the next collage, the two methods A and B compared side by side:
My very personal choice goes to the more compact look.

7. Elements of design in onion rings

Warning: The title is misleading: the Onion Ring  IS  an element of design in tatting.

But, for the sake of curiosity, for example, can the inner ring be block tatting? It seems that tatters already answered to that question, in fact, I learned that the central inner ring can be substituted with other elements, like in the Cluny Onion Ring.

And not only clunies have been put inside rings: in one of her patterns, Muskaan put double true rings inside a mock ring (shared here: https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2017/05/journey-of-single-shuttle.html ).
(I think there is another designer that put 2 rings inside a bigger ring in a pattern, but in this moment I can’t remember the name)

UPDATE: Ha Mi-Kyeong is a Korean designer that put 2 rings inside a bigger ring in a pattern, here:
https://m.blog.naver.com/rein9814/220838776350 , she can be found in Instagram, too: https://www.instagram.com/p/BiBDhB6A5dk

7.1 Cluny Onion Ring

Basically, you tat the Cluny leaf, then you tat a chain around it, that closes at its base and becomes a mock ring, joining the opposite end of the leaf with the alligator join.

References:
Victats: Boo-yah ghost: https://victats.blogspot.com/2019/10/boo-yah-ghost.html
Muskaan: 2-Tone Cluny Bracelet: https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2018/09/clunied.html

In the next pictures:
First shuttle = core shuttle (yellow thread)
Second shuttle = "ball" shuttle (red thread).

Pattern in my example (mixing both patterns above):
(I started with a ring: 5ds, picot,5ds; then chain: 3ds, picot, 3ds.)
Cluny is 12 wraps.
Wind loom with core shuttle and weave the Cluny leaf with second shuttle; let the second shuttle emerging from the right side (tip by Muskaan), then use it as core thread for the chain.
Outer mock ring/chain: leave a very small picot, then 14ds, Alligator Join to the beginning/base of Cluny, then 14ds.
To close the mock ring, I did an onion ring join.

>>>>>> The next one could be called Split Cluny Onion Ring: <<<<<<
All clunies are 12 wraps.
Wind loom with core shuttle and weave tally with second shuttle; let the second shuttle emerging from the right side (tip by Muskaan), then use it for making the loop around the hand.
Outer split ring: (make the loop around the hand with the second shuttle) leave a very small bare thread (for tolerance), 14ds. For the second side, with the first shuttle, leave a very small bare thread, then 14 reverse order reversed double stitches. To block the base of Cluny, I trapped the base of the leaf with an Alligator Join, between last reversed double stich and a reversed second half stitch, on the second side of the split ring.

In the next picture:
Sh1 = First shuttle = core shuttle (yellow thread)
Sh2 = Second shuttle = "ball" shuttle (red thread).
AJ = Alligator Join
rors = reverse order reverse stitches
rshs = reverse second half stitch


🧅🧅🧅🧅🧅🧅🧅🧅🧅🧅

All in all, I know my limits and this series is not all-inclusive. It’s my vade-mecum and I hope you will find it useful for your next onion rings projects, whichever way you prefer.

The sense of this last part is that any different method can be tuned to the pattern you’re going to face, the ultimate choice can be the designer’s or – if you feel adventurous – it’s up to you. A simple hint from my side is that you can tat your own samples, to use as future reference.

Many thanks to all those who chose to share, in tutorials, forum, videos and elsewhere online, thanks to all people mentioned in this series. Thanks to them I, in turn, can learn and share. Someone said that we are like dwarves on the shoulders of the giants that preceded us, that is true for whatever you learn and for tatting, too.

Ciao,
Ninetta

Thank you very much for all your nice comments.

Ciao
Ninetta