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Dear Reader,
I share here what I like and what works for me. If you've been following me, you know that I can change my mind from time to time, and feel free to comment that I'm completely wrong, you may be right. I'm not running a business. I'm not paid and have never received any compensation or facilitation for any review/brand/site here mentioned. In case one day we'll ever meet, I'll be the one offering you a cup of Italian coffee, too.
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Tuesday, 25 September 2018

a wide choice

In the next pictures, wide picots and butterfly picots are combined with treble tatting, I'm happy that I don't need another name for these combos! You know me, I struggle when it's time to find names! So, that's only another idea that can be merrily used in future designs!

⚠⚠⚠ Caution: monster in sight! ⚠⚠⚠  
You should already know how to tat a wide picot.

The existence of a "wide or lochness monster picot" is something I've learned from the OTC, I love that effect and I've used it in my own designs, for example in my doily "falbalà ". (I'm sorry I haven't shared the pattern for that doily, yet.) I've been tatting the wide picot following a video by Shannon (mytattingplace) here: https://youtu.be/qONlAylfXIQ
For other links, please read my old post wide (also the comments). 

The "butterfly picot" is another invention by the talented Lenka Hašková, you should know how to tat wide picot and a Lark's head joins for this technique, it is showed in a video by Karen Cabrera: https://youtu.be/1IHi3Pz9cQA

Then, what I'm going to share here, it isn't another new technique, but a combination of existing techniques. Actually, tatting today is very rich in techniques, tatters are spoiled for choice!

treble tatting tds
That thread is DMC Special Dentelles, size 80, colour is number 3766, Light Peacock Blue.

Of course, you can play and find other combos, but in this post you find how to tat:
- tds at the boundary of a wide picot
- tds at the boundary of a butterfly picot
- (one or more) tds "inside" a wide picot

For the sequence of steps for tatting a tds, please refer to my post: treble tatting - ideas or this other post by Muskaan: dissecting tds.

Before I forget: Muskaan has shared an alternate method of working the second half of a treble stitch. She noticed that the second part of the tds is actually just a twisted picot! Please, read her post here: https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2018/09/twist-n-twirl-spiral-n-swirl.html

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In next picture, the ecrù thread is DMC cordonnet special, size 10.
treble tatting tds
From left to right and up to down

I've tatted a ring, but this can be done in a chain, too.
In my example in previous collage (ring closed at the right bottom) there are 2 tds at the boundary of a wide picot. I started the ring with 4ds, then one tds. Then I left the thread for a long picot (I used a gauge), I tatted one ds and then "3ds inside" the wide picot (I'm not showing you how to do that technique, here). But the last tatted ds is already part of my next tds, in fact I used the long picot in place of the very small picot, that would have been needed for the first half tds. (So, I should have said: 2ds inside the wide picot, and 1tds at the boundary.) Pull up a loop of thread through the long picot. Then, take another loop of the ball thread and pull it through the previous loop, slip the shuttle through the loop and then pass the shuttle from back to front, through the loop, 3 times (that is the second half of the tds). Tighten the ball thread and then, pull the core thread.
I finished the ring with one very small picot and 4ds.

That is the same method that I used to tat the ring that I showed you in previous post, here again in next picture:
treble tatting tds
That ring has 4 wide picots, the first one starts from a ds, the others start just after the same tds that "close" the previous wide picot. That is: 3ds, first wide picot, 1ds, 1ds inside the wide picot, 1tds at the boundary, second wide picot, 1ds, 1ds inside the wide picot, 1tds at the boundary, third wide picot, 1ds, 1ds inside the wide picot, 1tds at the boundary, fourth wide picot, 1ds, 2ds inside the wide picot, 4ds, close ring.

In the next picture, the little motif has those chains in the last round with wide picots. The pattern for one chain in the corner, it is: 4ds, 1tds, wide picot, 1ds, 1ds inside the wide picot, 1tds at the boundary, 1tds, wide picot, 1ds, 1ds inside the wide picot, 1tds at the boundary, 4ds.
treble tatting tds
The second little motif is with the "butterfly picots" and it has tds at the boundary. The first tds is not a problem, as you've just seen, but the last it's different and here again, I'm using the long picot in place of the very small picot needed for the first half tds. It's the same as in previous wide picot:
treble tatting tds

🎀🎀🎀🎀🎀🎀🎀
The tds can be also tatted "inside" a wide picot:
treble tatting tds
From left to right and up to down
In this case, I used (in a similar manner as before) the last ds inside the wide picot, for making the first half tds. But this time the loop of the wide picot must be incorporated in the tds. The very small picot I used for the first half tds, it is on the left of the last tatted "inside ds". Pull up a loop of thread through that very small picot. Then, take another loop of the ball thread, catching in the middle the loop of the wide picot, too (look at central right pic in previous collage) and pull it through the previous loop, slip the shuttle through the loop and then pass the shuttle from back to front, through the loop, 3 times (that is the second half of the tds). Tighten the ball thread and then, pull the core thread.

Then, the following stitch must be tatted following the rule used for the "inside ds", that is the following ds is to be tatted inside the wide picot (and a very short picot is needed after the tds), like in the technique of the wide picot.

I took the same pictures with another thread, hoping that showing it in two colours could have helped.

The yellow thread in my next photos is DMC Cebelia n.10. You can see 2 tds inside the same wide picot. In the upper left pic in the collage, I'm pulling a loop through that very small picot inside the wide picot, on the left of last tatted ds. In the central right pic in the collage, there is how I start the first half ds just after the tds (following the video by Shannon). In the pic bottom left in the collage, you can see the second half ds just after the tds, in the bottom right there are 2 ds just after the tds.
treble tatting tds

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In both tds, at the boundary and inside the wide picot, I used the last tatted "inside ds": that ds disappears because it is incorporated in the first half tds.
What I changed, it is which (and how) picot you're using to pull the loop for tatting the second half of the tds.

That's all for now, even if I think that a video tutorial would have been a better choice, at least for me!

🎁 🎁 🎁 🎁 🎁 🎁 🎁
Do you like a sneak peek of next post?
treble tatting tds

Ciao,
Ninetta

8 comments:

  1. Thank you so much for sharing your wonderful ideas and explorations. Your work is truly inspiring.

    ReplyDelete
  2. You’re keeping us on our toes with new techniques Ninetta! I’m following rather slowly, but I do hope to make the butterfly mat.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you very much Jane, I can't wait to see your swirling butterflies :-f

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  3. Wow! You sure have come up with some interesting tatting!!! :)
    Love the blue piece!! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you very much for all your nice comments, Sue :X

      Delete
  4. The treble can do Anything a double can do, and more ;-D
    Move aside, double stitch !!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you dear Muskaan, first for being so supportive of me since the start and then for sharing with us your invaluable talent in explaining things :-f :X g-)

      Delete

Thank you very much for all your nice comments.

Ciao
Ninetta