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link to my tatting photos in Flickr
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Dear Reader,
I share here what I like and what works for me. If you've been following me, you know that I can change my mind from time to time, and feel free to comment that I'm completely wrong, you may be right. I'm not running a business. I'm not paid and have never received any compensation or facilitation for any review/brand/site here mentioned. In case one day we'll ever meet, I'll be the one offering you a cup of Italian coffee, too.
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Tuesday, 18 September 2018

siblings by chance, friends by choice

Thanks to Muskaan and Lalla Caliò! They both found by chance two different siblings (ops! I mean variants) of the tds.
treble tatting tds
I had started with a dmc size 10 thread, but then those siblings look alike, as it happens in many families. A close up didn't help, so I switched tatting with a rope...
treble tatting tds
In pictures:
tds = treble tatting stitch
htds = half  tds, kindly shared by Muskaan (you already know, she's the Smiling Lady);
ptds = padded tds, kindly shared by Lalla Caliò (you may find her in Facebook).
treble tatting tds

🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹
If you're following her blog, you know that Muskaan already shared her variant, here: https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2018/08/leaning-towers.html
She explained that forgot to pull the second loop (for the sequence of steps for tatting a tds, please refer to my post: treble tatting - ideas or this other post by Muskaan: dissecting tds).

Then, the first half of the tds lost its coils and the stitch leaned like a little Tower of Pisa! We agreed to call it the half treble (abbreviated: htds).
treble tatting tds
That is what she did with the half treble:
  • Start with a very small picot and one double stitch. 
  • Laying the picot across the ball thread and pull up a loop of thread through the picot.
  • Now slip the shuttle through the loop thus formed. Don't tighten it, yet. 
  • Take a loop of the core thread in the ring finger, then pass the shuttle from back to front, through the loop, 3 times. 
  • Tighten the ball thread and don't let the core thread slip out of place. 
  • Then, pull the core thread.
She also noticed that the second 'leg' of the tds can be done in the same way as we tat a twisted picot. She's a nice tatting friend, very clever. And generous, in fact she will share that soon. Like Georgia Seitz said: “There is no one way to tat”! (There is a DVD with an amazing collection of over 30 different styles of tatting, you may find it at this link: https://www.palmettotatters.org/fundraisers.shtml)
🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹🌹
The other variation is by Lalla Caliò.
Provided that the second part of the original tds is very similar to a vapour stitch (you can find one of my drawing in Flickr and a video by Karen Cabrera in her YouTube channel), Lalla found that the second part of the tds  can be substituted by something like a spiral knot. That is, the effect she obtained is that the wraps are coiled around the core thread. Actually, the spiral knot is a padded half stitch (there is another great video by Karen) and you may like reading again a very informative post by Muskaan about padded tatting (https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2015/11/pds-padded-double-stitch.html).

So, I suggested her to call this the padded treble (abbreviated: ptds).
treble tatting tds
That is what Lalla did for tatting the padded treble:
  • Start with a very small picot and one double stitch. 
  • Laying the picot across the ball thread and pull up a loop of thread through the picot. 
  • Then, take another loop of the ball thread and pull it through the previous loop.
  • Now slip the shuttle 3 times through the loop thus formed. Don't tighten it, yet. 
  • Tighten the ball thread and don't let the core thread slip out of place. 
  • Then, pull the core thread.
I tried many times and found out that - for me - passing the shuttle from front to back is better than passing it from back to front, through the loop. But it can be something useful to know, when creating front and back side for a tatting element. You may try yourself out and let me know your opinion.
treble tatting tds

That's just the theory.  Many thanks to those nice friends who shared their ideas and gave me the permission to share with you, too. As a good friend said, "who know when or where someone might use it"!
The petals in the rose are tatted by Lalla with padded trebles. It's lovely, isn't it?

In the next picture, a family portrait:
treble tatting tds
The stitches' heigh decreases, the taller being the tds, then the half tds, then there's the ptds that is quite the same level as the ds.

🍬🍬🍬🍬🍬🍬🍬
And what are you going to call that monster of mine?
treble tatting tds
(details in a week!)

Ciao,
Ninetta

 

13 comments:

  1. Very interesting!! :) You are all so creative!!
    Not sure if you were looking for a name for that last piece, but I thought it looked like Jump Ropes.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Sue! :-f
      That's a lovely name, you made me smile!

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  2. Its wonderful that your treble tatting has led to others making discoveries. Even more wonderful that you are all willing to share your discoveries and techniques.

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  3. I absolutely Love the kinship metaphors you've used throughout!!! Lalla's rose is superb g-)
    I still maintain that your original tds is visually the best :-)
    One point about the ptds - it is broader than the tds or htds at the base.
    I used fs/bs in the swirling butterflies tat-along - I couldn't see much difference in the wrapped part of the tds, so I simply tatted the ds part of it as rods. It seems to work. But you judge when I blog about it with pics ...

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  4. Thank you so much for sharing these fantastic tips! Even though in your last motif the thread doesn't go all around the ring, it made me think of a lifebuoy... go figure!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks to you! That's another nice name! :)

      Delete
  5. Looks interesting! Must spend some this Spring break going over your blog posts :).

    ReplyDelete
  6. Very interesting when I come back off holiday I will be trying this

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Thank you very much for all your nice comments.

Ciao
Ninetta