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link to my tatting photos in Flickr
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Dear Reader,
I share here what I like and what works for me. If you've been following me, you know that I can change my mind from time to time, and feel free to comment that I'm completely wrong, you may be right. I'm not running a business. I'm not paid and have never received any compensation or facilitation for any review/brand/site here mentioned. In case one day we'll ever meet, I'll be the one offering you a cup of Italian coffee, too.
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Tuesday, 18 September 2018

siblings by chance, friends by choice

Thanks to Muskaan and Lalla Caliò! They both found by chance two different siblings (ops! I mean variants) of the tds.
I had started with a dmc size 10 thread, but then those siblings look alike, as it happens in many families. A close up didn't help, so I switched tatting with a rope...
In pictures:
tds = treble tatting stitch
htds = half  tds, kindly shared by Muskaan (you already know, she's the Smiling Lady);
ptds = padded tds, kindly shared by Lalla Caliò (you may find her in Facebook).

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If you're following her blog, you know that Muskaan already shared her variant, here: https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2018/08/leaning-towers.html
She explained that forgot to pull the second loop (for the sequence of steps for tatting a tds, please refer to my post: treble tatting - ideas or this other post by Muskaan: dissecting tds).

Then, the first half of the tds lost its coils and the stitch leaned like a little Tower of Pisa! We agreed to call it the half treble (abbreviated: htds).
That is what she did with the half treble:
  • Start with a very small picot and one double stitch. 
  • Laying the picot across the ball thread and pull up a loop of thread through the picot.
  • Now slip the shuttle through the loop thus formed. Don't tighten it, yet. 
  • Take a loop of the core thread in the ring finger, then pass the shuttle from back to front, through the loop, 3 times. 
  • Tighten the ball thread and don't let the core thread slip out of place. 
  • Then, pull the core thread.
She also noticed that the second 'leg' of the tds can be done in the same way as we tat a twisted picot. She's a nice tatting friend, very clever. And generous, in fact she will share that soon. Like Georgia Seitz said: “There is no one way to tat”! (There is a DVD with an amazing collection of over 30 different styles of tatting, you may find it at this link: https://www.palmettotatters.org/fundraisers.shtml)
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The other variation is by Lalla Caliò.
Provided that the second part of the original tds is very similar to a vapour stitch (you can find one of my drawing in Flickr and a video by Karen Cabrera in her YouTube channel), Lalla found that the second part of the tds  can be substituted by something like a spiral knot. That is, the effect she obtained is that the wraps are coiled around the core thread. Actually, the spiral knot is a padded half stitch (there is another great video by Karen) and you may like reading again a very informative post by Muskaan about padded tatting (https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2015/11/pds-padded-double-stitch.html).

So, I suggested her to call this the padded treble (abbreviated: ptds).
That is what Lalla did for tatting the padded treble:
  • Start with a very small picot and one double stitch. 
  • Laying the picot across the ball thread and pull up a loop of thread through the picot. 
  • Then, take another loop of the ball thread and pull it through the previous loop.
  • Now slip the shuttle 3 times through the loop thus formed. Don't tighten it, yet. 
  • Tighten the ball thread and don't let the core thread slip out of place. 
  • Then, pull the core thread.
I tried many times and found out that - for me - passing the shuttle from front to back is better than passing it from back to front, through the loop. But it can be something useful to know, when creating front and back side for a tatting element. You may try yourself out and let me know your opinion.

That's just the theory.  Many thanks to those nice friends who shared their ideas and gave me the permission to share with you, too. As a good friend said, "who know when or where someone might use it"!
The petals in the rose are tatted by Lalla with padded trebles. It's lovely, isn't it?

In the next picture, a family portrait:
The stitches' heigh decreases, the taller being the tds, then the half tds, then there's the ptds that is quite the same level as the ds.

🍬🍬🍬🍬🍬🍬🍬
And what are you going to call that monster of mine?
(details in a week!)

Ciao,
Ninetta

 

Tuesday, 11 September 2018

swirling butterflies - it's about time!

Please make yourself comfortable, I took many pictures, all numbered, to show you how I tatted the swirling butterflies. I tried to do my best. Anyway, sorry if you think that I missed/messed-up something, don't hesitate to leave a comment, thank you.
For the sequence of steps for tatting a tds (= treble tatting stitch), please refer to my post: treble tatting - ideas or this other post by Muskaan: dissecting tds
Or you would like watching this video in YouTube: https://youtu.be/ra0NnlqR0oA (for shuttle) or this video: https://youtu.be/vxl1ZzPLrZg (for needle)

You'll find all my posts about treble tatting with the label treble.

For how to join a tds to a previous element, refer to this post by Muskaan (she shows us two methods, mine and hers): https://tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2018/07/multiples.html

The butterflies are the third round for the little doily showed here: fun swirly effect in treble tatting
You'll find this doily related posts, with pattern, with the label swirling butterflies.
But before writing the third round's pattern, I'd prefer sharing 2 samples, step by step.
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In next pictures, from picture 1 to 12, there's one butterfly tatted with the same thread of the chain. That is only to show you that it is just something you can handle with 2 shuttles.
The effect showed in the little doily, that is the butterflies on the chains, it is just a trick, an optical illusion due to a third thread, encapsulated inside the chain. The steps from 13 to 22 show how I tatted it with 3 shuttles.
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CTM= continuous thread method
ds=double stitch;
vsp= very small picot:
tds=treble tatting stitch;
hidden picot= a very small picot every each tds, also between adjacent ds and tds (or tds and ds, as well);
FR= floating ring;
TJ = one tds that join itself to a previous picot (I've used Muskaan's method, please refer to her blog);
ABJ= I used a method similar to an ANKARS back join (https://flic.kr/p/fzjRhh), for joining the two wings, but with a TJ.

The core shuttle in next samples is that one with the white thread, and those white rings are there just for the sole purpose of starting the next chain.

Butterfly with tds, 2 shuttles, from picture 1 to 12.
Pic 1) Start a chain: 4ds (the last one is already part of the butterfly)
Pic 2) 3tds
Pic 3) with the second shuttle, start a FR: 6ds, join to the first hidden picot, before the last ds and the first tds on the chain,
Pic 4) continue the FR: 9ds, picot, 6ds. Close the FR.
Pic 5) with the first shuttle, tat one tds. Then with the second shuttle: start a FR: 1ds,
Pic 6) 2tds
Pic 7) TJ (Muskaan's method):  here I join the second wing to the first: leave a vsp and tat one ds (that is the starting step of next tds), but then here I put the current FR below the first FR, like you were doing an ABJ. Insert hook through both picot of previous FR and vsp of  current tds,
Pic 8) pull a loop, then pull up another loop through it and finish the tds with 3 wraps.
I wrote there "front", where I mean the front side of the chain that we're looking while tatting the chain.
That is not what I call the front side of the 'Swirling Buttlerflies' doily, because I'm reversing the work form rings to chains. For me, the right(front) side of the doily is the side I have in front of me when I tat rings. So, the second wing is over the first, if you look at it from the front side of the doily. I'm sorry if I can't find better words. 🙇
Pic 9) Continue the second FR: 2 tds,
Pic 10) vsp, 9ds. Close the FR.
Pic 11) with the second shuttle, start the third FR: 3ds, normal picot, 3ds, close.
Pic 12) continue the chain with 4ds.
Then, I reversed the work and tatted another ring with the first shuttle, just to complete the little sample.

Butterfly with tds, 3 shuttles, from picture 13 to 22.
I suggest putting a label on the shuttles, or use different shuttles.
Pic 13) the white ring is there just for the sole purpose of starting the next chain. I started with 2 shuttles CTM (white thread)
Pic 14) Reverse work. Add the third thread and work with 2 shuttles in hand, white thread core shuttle and yellow thread shuttle. Tat 4ds in that way.

Pic 15) Here is where the trick starts. Put the yellow thread around the hand and the white threads both in your hand acting together as one core shuttle.
Pic 16) Tat 1ds
Pic 17) 3tds
Pic 18) FR: 6ds, join to the hidden picot before the last ds and the first tds on the chain, 9ds, picot, 6ds, close FR;
Pic 19) 1tds; start second FR: 1ds,
Pic 20) 2tds, TJ (joining to last picot in previous FR, same as in pics 7 and 8), 2tds, vsp, 9ds, close FR;
Pic 21) FR: 3ds, picot, 3ds, close FR;
Pic 22) continue the chain with 1ds;

Exchange threads again:
Pic 23) work with 2 shuttles in hand, the white thread first shuttle and yellow thread shuttle, acting both together as core shuttle. Tat 4ds.
Pic 24) reverse work and turn to tat another white ring, if you like. That will end the second sample.

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Pattern for the Swirling Butterflies motif - Third round:
Start with 2 shuttles with the green, CTM.
With the first green shuttle:
R1) start a ring (white numbers in pic): 3ds, join to the hidden picot between the 6th and 7th tds of one spiral ring of previous round, 3ds, picot, 1ds. Close.
R2) start a ring (red numbers in pic): 1ds, join to last picot of R1, 4ds, join to the hidden picot between the 5th and 6th tds of same spiral ring of previous round, 6ds. Close.
Reverse work.
Ch1) start a chain with the second green shuttle (black numbers). If you like, you can add the third yellow shuttle, already.  Chain: 4ds, picot, 4ds, picot, 4ds, picot, 4ds. Reverse work.
Repeat R1, joining next spiral ring.
Repeat R2 and reverse work.
Ch2) work with 2 shuttles in hand, green thread core shuttle and yellow thread shuttle. Start 4ds, then exchange threads and start the butterfly with 1ds with the yellow thread, with 2 shuttles in hand, the 2 green thread shuttles. Then the butterfly is exactly the same pattern showed in pictures from 15 to 22. Finish the chain, again with 2 shuttles in hand, the green thread core shuttle and yellow thread shuttle. Tat 4ds. Reverse work
Repeat again R1,R2,Ch1,R1,R2,Ch2, till you have seven butterflies. (The round ends with one Ch2 chain).
Use your favourite method to tie, cut and hide ends.

🦋🦋🦋🦋🦋🦋🦋🦋🦋🦋🦋🦋🦋🦋


Ciao,
Ninetta

Tuesday, 4 September 2018

swirling butterflies need a flower...

... at least one! I've been tatting spirals to test my pattern and I've plenty of yellow and lilac thread, that I'll soon have a spring garden!

Starting from this post, I'm sharing the pattern for the "swirling butterflies", the doily with spiral rings and butterflies in treble tatting.

I'm a shuttle tatter, but it can be done also in needle tatting (I've put a video in YouTube to show my way to do it. Link to the video: https://youtu.be/vxl1ZzPLrZg). 

I'm tatting with Anchor thread size 70, very soft.


Note: There is a little bare thread appearing between each tds, so we have a very small picot every each tds. I call it the "hidden picot".


ds=double stitch;
tds=treble tatting stitch;
⭐= don't reverse here, if you do direct tatting for chains


The spiral rings in this pattern are actually all rings of 1ds and 8tds, that is:
With one shuttle:
  1. start a ring with one double stitch
  2. tat 8 tds. (I don't tat any ds after the last treble)
  3. insert the shuttle inside of the loop around the hand, from front to back, before closing the ring.
  4. close the ring.
  5. Then, the thread is passed to the back side and pulled upwards. 
  6. Pull the thread toward the hidden picot between the third and the fourth tds. Then block the spiral in position with a lock join. 
Repeat those steps for a total of 14 spirals. Leave a long tail of thread and cut. Do not close the round of spirals. The spirals have a front and a back side.
(The tail will be used later, to close the round of spirals after you have the centre done).

The spirals will go as a second round, but I tatted them first. Then I tatted the yellow centre. That is because I found easier to join the yellow rings to the spirals, than joining the tds to the yellow rings. You may follow your favourite order.

Centre (with yellow thread in my pictures).
They are all rings of 3+3+3-3 and chains of 3, that is:
With one shuttle and ball (or 2 shuttles):
  1.  Start with a ring: 3ds, picot, 3ds, join to the hidden picot between the first and the second tds of the last tatted spiral ring (Picture 1), then continue the ring with 3ds, picot, 3ds; close the ring and reverse work (⭐)
  2. Chain: 3ds;  reverse work (⭐)
  3. Ring: 3ds, join to previous ring, 3ds, join to the hidden picot between the first and the second tds of the next spiral ring (Picture 2), then 3ds, picot, 3ds; close the ring and reverse work (⭐)
  4. Repeat step 2.  then step 3. , till you join all spirals, except the last
  5.  Chain: 3ds;  reverse work (⭐)
  6. Ring: 3ds, join to previous ring, 3ds, join to the hidden picot between the first and the second tds of the last spiral ring, 3ds, join to the very first ring, 3ds; close the ring and reverse work (⭐)
  7. Chain: 3ds; use your favourite way to tie and cut ends. (You see the back side of my centre in previous picture, in the lower right pic. I still have to hide tails)

If you like avoiding the colour blip on the back side, you may read this post of mine: http://ninettacaruso.blogspot.com/2016/03/how-to-skin-cat.html

You may find a very interesting - and useful - post by Muskaan that is a compilation of methods for hiding ends: tipsaroundthehome.blogspot.com/2016/11/beginning-or-ending.html

In next post, I'll show you how I tat those "swirling butterflies" all around.

💛💜💛💜💛💜💛💜💛💜💛💜💛💜💛💜
I've been to a fair, last week, thanks to a dear friend, who drove for 3 hours the way to there and back... An amazing fair with any sort of lace! Everything was breathtaking! There are some picture in "Scuola Di Ricamo Valtopina" in Facebook, and also have a look in this site: www.mostravaltopina.it. I'm happy because I met 3 tatters! 😍😍😍 One of them is Giuliana Pizzini, a Master tatter from Abruzzo (you can find her in Facebook, too) a very nice, smiling and friendly person, her tatting is truly beautiful, she sells it and her spot there was full of amazing lace! She gave me 😍😋 this lovely bookmark:

I also met the affable cheerful Giovanna, from Sicily, she embroiders but also tats, and sells, she displayed two amazing tablecloths with traditional tatting and embroidery (it is listed in her site as "Tovaglia in lino e Chiacchierino che può fungere da coperta o tenda").

I bought 2 books: one is "I fazzoletti. Breve storia d'un amore" by Damiano Pellicano; the second one is "Nappe, nappine e bottoni della Scuola del Pischiello di Romeyne Robert Ranieri di Sorbello" by Geneviève Porpora. 

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Dear Reader,
I share here what I like and what works for me. If you've been following me, you know that  I can change my mind from time to time, and feel free to comment that I'm completely wrong, you may be right. I'm not running a business. I'm not paid and have never received any compensation or facilitation for any review/brand/site here mentioned. In case one day we'll ever meet, I'll be the one offering you a cup of Italian coffee, too.

Ciao,
Ninetta



Tuesday, 28 August 2018

spiral rings with treble tatting

This is how I tat the spiral rings with tds in place of ds, just like the spiral rings by Lenka Hašková, showed in previous post: the spiral ring by Lenka
For the spiral ring in that picture, with treble tatting stitches:
  1. start a ring with one double stitch
  2. tat 8 tds (that is: I finished just after the 8th, didn't tat any other ds after that) (*)
  3. insert the shuttle inside of the loop, from front to back, before closing the ring (**)
  4. close the ring.
  5. Then, the thread is passed to the back side and pulled upwards. You see, from the next picture, that there is a little bare thread appearing between each tds, so we have a very small picot every each tds that plays hide-and-seek. I will call it the "hidden picot".  
  6. Pull the thread toward the hidden picot between the fourth and the fifth tds. Then block the spiral in position with a lock join.

(*) The number of tds can vary, of course, it depends on the pattern.
(**) The spiral can be oriented in the opposite direction, just don't insert the shuttle inside of the loop, from front to back, before closing the ring.

Depending on the pattern, any of the "hidden picots" can be used to block the spiral in position.
Beads can be added, too. I didn't took any picture, though.

I tried another version, combining ds and tds in the same spiral ring. In previous picture, I started with 13 picots separated by 1 normal ds each, then I tatted one last tds, posted the shuttle inside the loop and blocked the spiral, locking the thread in the 7th picot. The height of the picots and the last tds make the spiral look like previous all-tds spiral, but tatting this one is way too faster than tatting all tds!

The spiral rings with tds are part of the little motif showed here: fun swirly effect in treble tatting
(They resemble those cute aquarium snails, called Planorbis... 🐌🐌🐌🐌🐌🐌)
In that motif, the "hidden picot" is between the third and the fourth tds.

I'm planning to share the pattern, starting from next week. I hope that someone of you wish to tat-along with me and I really hope to have any feedback, too.

If you like, you can start now, as the pattern starts with a lanyard of spiral rings. Actually, there are 14 spiral rings. At least, if not my motif, with 2 detached set of 2 or 3 spirals, you will have a new pair of earrings 🙇 !
I admit... that tds aren't fast tatting, definitely.
It is just like when we did the very first "flip", tricky at first but so addictive. Me too, I need more exercise.

Thinking aloud: it seems to me that tds can be used in place of double stitches in a various set of tatting techniques: rings, chains (even in place of picots), block tatting, mock rings, split rings, maltese and pearl tatting, 3D, beanile, ANKARS,... I've just scratched the surface. I need more time to try and share everything, but I know that I'm not alone. Thanks to other nice tatters, who generously share their experiments! Like Muskaan, that already shared her tips for treble tatting! 🤩
I'm a shuttle tatter, but it can be done also in needle tatting (I've put a video in YouTube to show my way to do it). I can't wait to see designers using it 😍 💌🌹

Ciao,
Maybe, you didn't know that "ciao" it's used in place of both "hello" and "bye" and I've learnt that we've used this word in the current way only for a couple of centuries, from the early nineteenth century, so it seems it is just as old as tatting 😍.
Ninetta

Tuesday, 21 August 2018

the spiral ring by Lenka

How to tat the spiral rings by Lenka Hašková, showed in previous post.

I've saved her neat and delicate tatting, she sent me in 2015:
I asked her permission to write a tutorial in my blog and she kindly agreed.
She also agreed to call it "the spiral ring", but I'm sorry, forgive me if I call it Lenka's ring! You can find her blog here: frivolenka.blogspot.com, please, take a minute to visit her and say a thank you!

In order to tat Lenka's spiral ring, I learned that:
  • Only one shuttle is needed.
  • Lenka's "spiral ring" is a normal ring, with at least one picot, twisted and blocked in position through one of its picots.
  • After closing the ring, the thread is passed to the back side and pulled upwards,  toward the picot. Then block the spiral in position with a lock join.
  • The picot used to block the spiral in position, may vary in size. That determines the distance between spirals. If you want a lanyard of spiral rings very close to each other, the picot used to block the spiral must be very small.
  • "To post or not to post" shuttle: not the hamletic doubt, but inserting or not the shuttle inside of the loop, from front to back, before closing the ring, that sets the direction of the spiral effect (clockwise or counterclockwise)
  • Any ring can be twisted in this way, as long as there is a picot in it, in any position on the outer spiral; the twist is made only after the ring is closed.
  • As a design element, it is like a single shuttle split ring, where the starting point and the ending point are not at the same point. 
  • It has a front and a back side, because it is just like the nineteenth-century method of tatting a lanyard of rings with bare thread in the middle, in order to climb to the next ring in the line.
  • Beads can be added inside the loop for the ring, too. A bead (or more) can be trapped at the base of the ring to emphasise the twist. 
  • Just after that the ring has been closed and before the lock join, bead/beads can be added in the bare thread between the base of the ring and the join, to put an accent in the centre of the spiral ring.
Thread in my photos is DMC Cebelia n.10. Beads are 9/0. (And ds stands for double stich, as usual.)
In the next collage, I started a ring, putting a bead inside the loop, and tatted 6ds, then a picot, then 6ds more. You can see from the third pic in the collage, that I posted the shuttle inside the loop,before closing it:
So, there I got a normal ring, with a picot in the centre and a bead trapped at the base.

In next collage the spiral is appearing: I put the thread behind the ring, that's the back side from now on, then pull it (in the meantime you hold firmly the thread at the base of the ring) and slide a bead in the bare thread between the base of the ring and the picot, then lock join to the picot.
In the next collage you can see, on the left, the spiral ring completed, the front of the spiral is clockwise. On the right, there is also a second spiral, started over the first, just after the lock join, this time I tatted a ring of 8ds, then a picot, then 6 ds, then, before closing, again I inserted the shuttle inside the loop.
In the third spiral ring, I didn't post the shuttle, closed the ring, then put the thread behind and pulled it upwards toward the picot, so the spiral ring flipped over its vertical axis and it looks counterclockwise:
On the right of previous picture, you see that I didn't put beads in the last spiral ring, the twist is clear indeed.
The size of the picot used to block the spiral in position, determines the distance between spiral rings. I wanted my last spirals very close to each other, so I made a very small picot in my last two spiral rings...
That is a delightful and interesting method and I think it can be a nice effect to learn and use in patterns. I hope that you like it and wish to play with it. Many many thanks to Lenka!

In my next post, I will show you how I tatted the spiral rings with treble tatting stitches in place of traditional double stitches.

Ciao,
Ninetta

Thank you very much for all your nice comments.

Ciao
Ninetta